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Tuesday, May 13
 

9:00am PDT

The Innovation Lab Presents: Soundcamp
Speakers
avatar for Jon Fulton

Jon Fulton

Video Producer, Open Learning, TRU
Jon Fulton is a video producer for Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning. He creates pedagogically-driven media pieces for distance courses. His business card should read “Image Acquisition and Manipulation,” although he also has extensive experience in audio manipulation... Read More →
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director of Learning Technology & Innovation, TRU Open Learning
Brian Lamb is Director, Learning Technology & Innovation. He spends a lot of time worrying about online ethics and practice, and sometimes he blogs about them at https://abject.ca Twitter: @brlamb... Read More →
avatar for Grant Potter

Grant Potter

Instructional Designer, UNBC
Pappy with the Khaki sweatbandBowed goat potbellied barnyard that only he noticedThe old fart was smartThe old gold cloth madonnaDancin’ t’ the fiddle ‘n sawHe ran down behind the knoll‘n slipped on his wooden fishheadThe mouth worked ‘n snapped all the beesBack t’ the... Read More →
avatar for Jason Toal

Jason Toal

Interaction Specialist, Simon Fraser University
@draggin on twitterJason brings a background in art, design, and education to the practice of Interaction Specialist. His focus is on the needs of users in whatever end product they may be using in their learning experience, from new web technologies, innovative media to drawing on... Read More →


Tuesday May 13, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm PDT
BC Centre for Open Learning, OL 127 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

9:00am PDT

Online Mapping
Speakers
avatar for Brenda Smith

Brenda Smith

Open Education Librarian, Thompson Rivers University
Brenda Smith is the Open Education Librarian at TRU. She is a recipient of a BCcampus Award for Excellence in Open Education. She has been supporting open education by conducting workshops and webinars, helping faculty to identify existing OER, and co-facilitating open textbook s... Read More →


Tuesday May 13, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm PDT
BCCOL 346

9:00am PDT

Gamification: How to Gamify Learning and Instruction (Part 1)
Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University


Tuesday May 13, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm PDT
International Building, IB 2006 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

9:00am PDT

Drawing on Walls: Opening Up Visual Practice Possibilities
Drawing  on  Walls:  Opening  Up  Visual  Practice  Possibilitieswith  Nancy  White

Tuesday May 13, 2014 9:00am - 4:30pm PDT
Old Main 1562

1:00pm PDT

The Innovation Lab Presents: Video Camp
Speakers
avatar for Bob Byrne

Bob Byrne

Curriculum Media Developer, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University
M.Ed. Graduate StudentFaculty of Human, Social and Educational DevelopmentThompson Rivers University"Bob Byrne has been involved in distance and online learning technologies since before Al Gore invented the World Wide Web." He worked at UVic, SFU, BCIT and the Commonwealth of Learning... Read More →
avatar for Jon Fulton

Jon Fulton

Video Producer, Open Learning, TRU
Jon Fulton is a video producer for Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning. He creates pedagogically-driven media pieces for distance courses. His business card should read “Image Acquisition and Manipulation,” although he also has extensive experience in audio manipulation... Read More →
avatar for Rob Swanson

Rob Swanson

Producer/Director, Open Learning, Curriculum Media Development Group, Thompson Rivers University
Rob has worked in instructional media development for fifteen years, starting with the Open Learning Agency in Burnaby, BC. He’s also worked as a broadcast journalist, commercial fisherman and professional fishing guide. Chasing news stories, red snapper and large spring salmon... Read More →


Tuesday May 13, 2014 1:00pm - 4:30pm PDT
BC Centre for Open Learning, OL 127 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:00pm PDT

Geocaching!
Speakers
avatar for Bart Cummins

Bart Cummins

writer/photographer, Thompson Rivers University
What do you think is the purpose of art?


Tuesday May 13, 2014 1:00pm - 4:30pm PDT
BCCOL 346

1:00pm PDT

Gamification: A Magic Bullet: Choosing and Using Games for the Classroom (Part 2)
Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University


Tuesday May 13, 2014 1:00pm - 4:30pm PDT
International Building, IB 2006 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8
 
Wednesday, May 14
 

7:30am PDT

Registration and Information Table Open
Wednesday May 14, 2014 7:30am - 8:30am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

8:00am PDT

Breakfast
Wednesday May 14, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

8:30am PDT

Welcome: Gordon Tarzwell, Vice-Provost, Open Learning, Diane Janes, President, CNIE, and Estella Patrick Moller, TRU First Nations Elder
Speakers
avatar for Diane Janes

Diane Janes

Associate Dean, Donald School of Business, Red Deer College
avatar for Dr. Gordon Tarzwell

Dr. Gordon Tarzwell

Vice-Provost, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Gordon Tarzwell joined the Open Learning Division of Thompson Rivers University in 2005 after working for 16 years in higher education. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from the University of Calgary as well as a Masters of Arts and a PhD in Economics from Queen's... Read More →


Wednesday May 14, 2014 8:30am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

9:00am PDT

Keynote: Audrey Watters: Silicon Valley’s (Ed-Tech) Innovation Culture vs a Culture of Innovative
Speakers
avatar for Audrey Watters

Audrey Watters

Writer, Hack Education
Writer @hackeducation, 2017-18 Spencer Fellow @columbiajourn, ed-tech's Cassandra, author of The Monsters of Education Technology


Wednesday May 14, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

10:00am PDT

Break / Refreshment
Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:00am - 10:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Rotunda 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

No Places, Cyberspaces: Digital Storytelling and Utopia in the Classroom
As part of a course on the Literature of Utopia, third-year students working in small groups were asked to construct their own utopian societies in online spaces. This presentation highlights the practical steps taken to create the multimedia projects, showcases some of the work itself and touches on the aesthetics of appropriation and its relation to the humanities.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators

Speakers
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director of Learning Technology & Innovation, TRU Open Learning
Brian Lamb is Director, Learning Technology & Innovation. He spends a lot of time worrying about online ethics and practice, and sometimes he blogs about them at https://abject.ca Twitter: @brlamb... Read More →
avatar for Ken Simpson

Ken Simpson

Associate Professor, English, Department of English and Modern Languages, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Teaching blended learning through a blended community of inquiry: A course for faculty in Sweden
This presentation addresses the use of the Community of Inquiry framework (Garrison et al., 2000, 2001) employed as the structure for the design of a blended learning course on blended learning for faculty at a large technical university in Sweden. The overall aim of the course is to provide faculty with the opportunity to design and implement blended or online course components in their undergraduate and graduate level courses. The course covers both theory and the application of online and blended teaching strategies in higher education. The theoretical part of the course is founded in the Community of Inquiry framework for blended learning presented in Vaughan et al. (2013). The practical part of the course consists of participants designing modules for blended learning delivery implemented in their own courses.

This presentation will cover the faculty response to this PD course; provide opportunity to review, discuss and critique principles of blended teaching in higher education as expressed by the model used; examine teaching issues and identify intervention strategies using ICTs; and consider the impact of disciplinary differences as expressed by faculty in the course.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Martha Cleveland-Innes

Martha Cleveland-Innes

Professor & Chair, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for Stefan Stenbom

Stefan Stenbom

Lecturer, PhD candidate, Department of Learning, KTH Royal Institute of Technology


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Building Our Capacity for Intercultural Education: A Journey of Innovation
A panel of pioneers at Thompson Rivers University will share their experience with the evolution of intercultural education on campus, which includes areas in professional development, classroom practice, curricular/co-curricular revisions and research. A brief presentation of their long-time efforts will be followed by a Q & A session to discuss the challenges and opportunities in implementing these initiatives. This is a Q&A panel.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Emma Bourassa

Emma Bourassa

esl, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Lian Dumouchel

Lian Dumouchel

Teaching Professor and Chair, Thompson Rivers University
Lian (Evangelia) Dumouchel has been a faculty member at Thompson Rivers University (TRU) since 1994 and taken on a variety of roles including Program Coordinator, Chair, and International Academic Coordinator in the Tourism Management Department.She received a Teaching Excellence... Read More →
KG

Kyra Garson

Coordinator, Interculturalization, Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, TRU
Kyra Garson is a faculty member at Thompson Rivers University in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. She is also an intercultural trainer and researcher who has developed and delivered PD programmes to educational institutions across the Canada and internationally... Read More →
avatar for Carol Rees

Carol Rees

Associate Professor, TRU Faculty of Education and Social Work
Dr. Rees is an Assistant Professor in the School of Education at TRU. Her primary interest is in teaching and research in the fields of science and technology education. She is also recently interested in teaching and learning at intercultural intersections. She has enjoyed supervising... Read More →
avatar for Loretta Teng

Loretta Teng

Instructional Designer, Open Learning – Instructional Design Group, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Reflections on Facilitating Critical Thinking Sessions for Online Learners
At Athabasca University—Canada’s Open University—a multidisciplinary approach was adopted to conduct a series of webinars on critical thinking for graduate students over the past two years. Drawing on panelists’ experience with these webinars and their expertise in Interdisciplinary Studies, Information Literacy, Academic Writing and Learning Design, this presentation will address strategies to guide learners’ in developing critical thinking skills. Panelists will discuss and share reflections on designing, developing, facilitating and evaluating educational development activities to support post-secondary students’ critical skills in an online context.

The presentation will provide an overview of critical thinking and discuss the three schools that dominate current day practice: philosophical, psychological and generalist. The generalist approach is then discussed and critiqued in relation to Bloom’s original taxonomy of educational outcomes and its subsequent refinements.

Next, the connection between the research process and critical thinking is examined. Focusing on analysis, evaluation and synthesis, this section of the presentation provides a critical thinking approach and a set of strategies that can be employed across a variety of disciplines.

The connection between clear thinking and good writing in an academic setting is then addressed. Parallels between the writing process and a student’s ability to think, read and write critically will be examined, using Toulmin’s rhetorical model, and the ways students can refine and challenge their own thinking, using the drafting process, will also be discussed.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
CB

Corinne Bossé

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
avatar for Derek Briton

Derek Briton

Chair, Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies, Faculty of Humanity and Social Sciences, Athabasca University
avatar for Elaine Fabbro

Elaine Fabbro

Acting Director, Library Services, Athabasca University
avatar for Linda McCloud-Bondoc

Linda McCloud-Bondoc

Write Site Coordinator, Faculty of Humanity and Social Sciences, Athabasca University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Undergraduate Conference Culture: Creating Places for the Exchange of Ideas
Now in its ninth year, the TRU Undergraduate Student Research & Innovation Conference is a place where students from any program can share their work with the rest of campus. The department-specific TRU Philosophy, History & Politics Undergraduate Conference just held its seventh annual event. For students, these conferences present opportunities to be at the front of the classroom, in the role of lecturer; students also present posters, organize volunteers and support one another in a culture that celebrates undergraduate research achievements. For faculty, preparing students for conferences provides opportunities for engagement outside the boundaries of classroom spaces, and moderating sessions in potentially unfamiliar disciplines creates a place of discovery for everyone involved.

Presenters will describe how our local conferences have developed, including how various stakeholders were brought on board, the ongoing attempts to provide workshops to help students prepare and how digital elements, such as the online archiving of student posters and the introduction of an accompanying video contest, might increase the conference’s reach and audience.

Participants will understand the opportunities and challenges involved in organizing a multi-discipline undergraduate conference, and recognize how differing disciplinary perspectives on research both enhance and complicate these events. Participants will be encouraged to relate their own experiences with providing undergraduate students places for sharing their work. This session will be of interest to post-secondary educators, as well as to high school teachers interested in finding out more about the research opportunities available to students once they reach university.

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, K-12 educators

Speakers
avatar for Cassandra Bradshaw

Cassandra Bradshaw

VPA Theatre, Thompson Rivers University
Visual and Performing Arts
avatar for Nancy Flood

Nancy Flood

Principal Lecturer & Co-chair, Dept. of Biological Sciences and OLFM, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Elizabeth Rennie

Elizabeth Rennie

Instruction & Research Librarian, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

The Virtue of Failure: Designing Games You Can’t Win for Learning
Just what do we learn from playing serious games? Especially common in games for learning is the notion that participants need to be able to win the game, but is it always necessary for the player to win in order to ‘get’ our message? In his studies of productive failure, Kapur (2008) has suggested that failure can be important to learning. Indeed, when we think back on our most memorable learning experiences we often find that these lessons are things learned through failure rather than success. Learning through failure is an effective way to help people learn how to cope with situations where there is no clear solution (Dorner et al., 1990), and for certain kinds of messages negative messages delivered via games you can’t win may be more powerful than those you can.

This presentation explores a class of games where ‘winning’ doesn’t look the way we expect it to look. Some games don’t allow players to win at all, in which case the message is effectively a cautionary tale. The authors refer to these games as “games you can’t win,” and they form a distinctly different approach to game design (examples include: Sweatshop, Darfur is Dying and September 12th). This presentation will examine the philosophical background of games in education and the design of serious games, and it will look at both accidental and deliberately designed unwinnable games and how this relates to learning objectives.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University
avatar for Dana Ruggiero

Dana Ruggiero

Senior Lecturer Learning Technology, Bath Spa University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
International Building, IB 2004 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:45am PDT

Teaching ‘Diversity’ via an Online Course
Can features of an online course leverage transformational change within students? In this presentation, new and innovative online tools along with the theoretical aspects behind diversity will be showcased. We will share the transformational journey students are taken on in this ‘diversity’ course. This session is meant to be interactive.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Instructional designers

Speakers
avatar for Liza Choi

Liza Choi

Associate Professor, Nursing and Midwifery, Mount Royal University
avatar for Patti Mascaro

Patti Mascaro

Instructional Design Consultant, Academic Development Centre, Mount Royal University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:15am PDT

Break / Refreshment
Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:15am - 11:30am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Rotunda 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Identifying the Online Learning Preferences of Adult Aboriginal Students
In previous research, we created a survey that examined the supports and obstacles related to Aboriginal university students completing face-to-face courses. We found that academic performance at university and student engagement (relationships with faculty and other students) were the strongest predictors of Aboriginal graduation (Walton et al., 2013). We expanded our face-to-face survey to include questions directly related to Aboriginal online course completion, and we are developing an online version.

Very early we learned that many Aboriginal students taking Adult Basic Education (ABE) online had very limited experience with the variety of online course options currently available. Some online ABE courses were based primarily on a textbook that students received by mail. To identify the online learning preferences of Aboriginal university students who have had limited experience with online learning options and access to the Internet and computer technology, we are developing an online survey that demonstrates a small number of online learning options, and then asks students to choose among these options. Our review of existing online course surveys did not find any online assessments that provided examples of online learning options in the areas of student-to-student engagement, student-to-faculty engagement and student-to-content engagement.

Our survey includes brief video segments of three options within each of the above forms of engagement, and then asks participants to rate each option based on three criteria:

  1. Cognitive criteria – “to what extent would the example encourage me to be attentive to and expend mental effort in the learning tasks encountered” (e.g., to integrate new material with previous knowledge);
  2. Behavioural criteria – “to what extent would I be encouraged to make active responses to the learning tasks presented” (e.g., asking questions, solving problems, participating in discussions); and
  3. Affective criteria – “to what extent would the example increase my investment in or emotional reaction to the learning (e.g., high levels of interest or positive attitudes towards the learning).

Our survey also includes questions related to family and financial factors that were found to be important by previous research with Aboriginal online students in Canada (Fahy, 2009).

The two intended audiences are educators who seek to improve the completion rate of Aboriginal students taking online courses, and researchers looking at assessing learning preferences of online students who have limited experience with a variety of online learning experiences.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Bob Byrne

Bob Byrne

Curriculum Media Developer, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University
M.Ed. Graduate StudentFaculty of Human, Social and Educational DevelopmentThompson Rivers University"Bob Byrne has been involved in distance and online learning technologies since before Al Gore invented the World Wide Web." He worked at UVic, SFU, BCIT and the Commonwealth of Learning... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Walton

Patrick Walton

Associate Professor, Education, Faculty of Human, Social and Educational Development, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Patrick Walton is a professor in the School of Education at Thompson Rivers University where he teaches Research Methods and Aboriginal.  He is from Saskatchewan and is mixed Aboriginal, French-Canadian, and English ancestry. He received his Ph.D. from the University of British... Read More →


Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Results of the Canadian Instructional Design Survey
In May 2013, my director was interested in knowing how many IDs other institutions had compared to URegina and what their roles were. I wanted to try to find an answer so I created a survey in Survey Monkey and distributed the link through CNIE and directly to people I knew. I will share the survey results from about 24 responses. Some of the questions asked in the survey were: name and size (FTE) of institution; # of distributed courses offered; # of IDs, AIDs and other technologists; location (centralized, decentralized), roles and workload of these staff members, ID salaries and preferred education credentials (minimum degree level and type of degree).

This presentation is intended to provide instructional designers, administrators and technologists with a small sampling of what other instructional designers and/or equivalent personnel do to develop face-to-face and other distributed learning courses at Canadian universities and colleges so that they might be compared to one’s own institution.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers

Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

I’m larger than a thumbnail: student, TA, faculty and program director experiences in a PBL informed online BA in Adult Education and Digital Technologies program
This presentation shares preliminary findings from a case self-study underway at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). The case study examines the experience of students, teaching assistants, professors and the program director in a synchronous online BA program in Adult Education and Digital Technologies (AEDT).

The Bachelor of Arts in AEDT is offered completely online, with a mandatory real-time videoconferencing component and a problem-based learning pedagogical framework that fosters the development of meaningful teacher-learner, learner-learner and learner-content relationships (van Oostveen & Desjardins, 2013). This case study investigates the attributes, affordances and role of synchronous technologies in fostering student and faculty engagement in the BA in AEDT program. In addition, it examines the impact of the synchronous component of the program on the creation of a learning community. Initial themes emerging from the data analysis will be shared, and implications on student and faculty support as well as program revisions will be discussed.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
avatar for Roland van Oostveen

Roland van Oostveen

Director, BA in Adult Education and Digital Technology, Faculty of Education, University of Ontario Institute of Technology


Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Smart Virtual Word Walls: Moving Away from the Traditional into the Digital
Research has indicated that English Language Learners (ELLs) need to be intentionally taught vocabulary using strategies such as glosses, word-focused activities and bilingual dictionaries (Kern, 1989; Lomicka, 1998; Laufer, 2003; Knight, 1994; Gunderson, 2009). Word walls can be used as a possible strategy to teach content area vocabulary to ELLs. Traditionally, word walls are described as a “designated section of a classroom wall that is devoted to the display and study of words” (Pinnell and Fountas, 1998, p. 38). The traditional word wall is referred to as being “interactive.” However, as the child is not able to touch or manipulate the words on the word wall physically, this limits the interactivity. This session focuses on a graduating paper inquiry, which proposes an alternative to the traditional word wall by using technology (SMART boards) to create a virtual word wall.

It is argued that technology should be used as a tool by educators, students and policy makers (Warshcauer, 2002). SMART boards are a technology-based learning tool which is actively being used in the K-12 classroom. Research has indicated positive gains for both limited proficient students in English and learning disabled students when using a SMART board (Wuerzer 2008; Mechling et al., 2007). Using a variety of modes (i.e., visuals, sounds and text), SMART virtual word walls provide an interactive multimodal learning experience for students to learn content area vocabulary. SMART virtual word walls have been implemented across several Calgary-area classrooms and this will be discussed.

Of Interest to: K-12 educators, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Melanie Wong

Melanie Wong

PhD Student, Language and Literacy Education, University of British Columbia


Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Bridging the Gap: A Panel's View of Blending Learning Spaces
The panel will share their experiences teaching in two learning spaces: the virtual, online environment and the face-to-face classroom. They will highlight both the successes and challenges of a blended model of instruction. Monica Sanchez-Flores (Sociology) will address how providing online resources in advance (podcasts, videos, readings) can increase engagement in class discussions, as well as how online discussions can be used to further students' understanding of written assignments. Kim Munich (Nursing) will share teaching techniques that engage students online and her own tips for teaching online. Jay Goddard (Social Work and Human Services) will relay his experience using blended approaches to increase course offerings in the small community of Williams Lake. Through these panelists’ experiences, session participants will gain some practical ideas for implementing blended learning in their own practice

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Jay Goddard

Jay Goddard

Human Service Program Coordinator, Faculty of Human, Social and Educational Development, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Melissa Jakubec

Melissa Jakubec

Instructional Designer, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning
avatar for Kim Munich

Kim Munich

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Kim Munich is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, Canada. Dr. Munich’s year career began with nursing clients in medical-surgical wards, Neuro ICU, extended care, community, and especially maternal/child high risk obstetrics... Read More →
avatar for Monica Sanchez-Flores

Monica Sanchez-Flores

Associate Professor & OLFM, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Mónica Sánchez-Flores is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Thompson Rivers University (TRU); where she teaches social theory, globalization and diversity courses. She has also engaged in equity (anti-discrimination or anti-oppression) training... Read More →


Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Using Google Apps for ePortfolios
ePortfolios are an effective way for students to engage with and reflect upon the process and product of their learning. Specifically, ePortfolios can be useful for creating and distributing educational philosophy statements and digital dossiers that illustrate and showcase examples of interest. In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn how they may use the tools within Google Apps for educational e-portfolios and digital dossiers. Participants will be invited to use their own Google accounts in this hands-on workshop, so that they may build skills with Google Apps by working with the features and functions in this facilitated session. Session facilitators will share lessons learned regarding different ePorfolio technologies during a recent transition from blogging platforms (such as Wordpress, Mahara, etc.) to an institutional version of Google Apps. Workshop learning outcomes include using Google Drive (including Google Docs) and Google Sites for pedagogically supported portfolio design, development and delivery.

The audience for this session includes educators, educational developers, instructional designers, educational technologists and anyone interested in learning more about how to use ePortfolios and Google Apps for Education.

This workshop will be highly interactive. Participants are encouraged to build skills through hands-on use of Google Apps.

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Heather Kanuka

Heather Kanuka

Professor, Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta
EE

Erika E. Smith

PhD Candidate, Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta
Educational technology and instructional designer for higher education.


Wednesday May 14, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
International Building, IB 2004 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

Community of Inquiry Meta-Analysis: Research and Community
This presentation reports the results of a recently completed applied meta-analysis of Community of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000) empirical research as well as the evolution of the website to support Community of Inquiry researchers, practitioners and community. Since publication of the keystone CoI framework, hundreds of research studies applying and extending the original Community of Inquiry framework have resulted in the development of theory, method and instruments for studying learning communities across multiple disciplines and in varied educational settings.

A research alliance reviewed more than 350 quantitative and mixed-methods empirical studies citing the keystone Garrison et al. (2000) publication, then completed a quantitative statistical meta-analysis of 50 studies. The short-listed studies were categorized by article focus (theoretical review, empirical test, practical application), and then analyzed for research methodology, original data or secondary data to determine which, if any, patterns are emerging in quantitative research being done on the COI Framework.

A Community of Inquiry website and online community have been established in conjunction with ongoing COI research to facilitate sharing of empirical evidence, practice implications and use of the COI framework in faculty development and course (re)design. The rationale underpinning the COI website and online community will also form part of this presentation.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Madelaine Befus

Madelaine Befus

Doctoral Student and Research Assistant, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for Martha Cleveland-Innes

Martha Cleveland-Innes

Professor & Chair, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for D. Randy Garrison

D. Randy Garrison

Professor, Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary
avatar for Marguerite Koole

Marguerite Koole

Instructional Media Analyst, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for Norm Vaughan

Norm Vaughan

Professor, Department of Education & Schooling, Faculty of Teaching & Learning, Mount Royal University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

An organizational perspective on a university wide blended learning initiative

The University of Alberta, through the Provost’s Digital Learning Committee (PDLC), has created the University of Alberta Blended Learning Award, which provides faculty members from across the university the ability to receive support from the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) for the redevelopment of current undergraduate courses into a blended learning format. Interest in examining how the utilization of technology and the classroom could improve the overall teaching and learning experience is central to this initiative.

This presentation will focus on the overall vision of this award and the process that was undertaken to determine the multiple redevelopment projects that were selected and will examine the current status and next steps of this initiative.

Learning Outcomes:
• Examine the context of blended learning in a university environment
• Discuss the various projects that fit within the blended learning award
• Review the current status and next steps of the initiative


Audience: Anyone looking at implementing a blended learning initiative to those who are currently evaluating or engaged in the development of a blended learning course and/or program.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Kari Rasmussen

Kari Rasmussen

Educational Developer, Centre for Teaching & Learning, University of Alberta


Wednesday May 14, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

Improving Student Accessibility through the use of Remote Instrumentation: The BC-ILN Project
There are considerable challenges in delivering authentic and meaningful student laboratory experiences at a distance. Virtual, remote and blended online laboratory learning experiences have been successfully incorporated into a variety of educational programs. The challenge remains in achieving wide acceptance of these modes of delivery as a valid learning experience, especially in the sciences.

At Thompson Rivers University (TRU), we have been actively investigating the use of remote operation of scientific instrumentation for undergraduate chemistry students. The BC-Integrated Laboratory Network (BC-ILN) initiative strives to improve access to chemical analysis instrumentation and supporting instructional material through the use of web-based technologies. The impact that these activities can have on undergraduate education and the student learning environment was explored by assessing and comparing traditional student laboratory practices and experiences to a remote experience. By incorporating the analysis of real world samples and “anyplace, anytime” learning practices into the collection of educational resources available to distance learners, we hope to provide genuine and mindful scientific opportunities for student learning.

This presentation explores the use of the various types of online chemistry laboratory learning activities; relates their use to best practices in online science education including defining learning objectives, assessing student learning and evaluating the instructional effectiveness; and discusses the importance of the scholarship of teaching and learning to validate this educational tool in current chemical education. We will also highlight the types of online lab activities currently used at TRU.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Sharon Brewer

Sharon Brewer

Assistant Professor, Physical Sciences (Chemistry), Thompson Rivers University
BC

Bruno Cinel

Associate Professor, Physical Sciences (Chemistry), Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:30pm PDT

Lunch
Wednesday May 14, 2014 12:30pm - 1:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Girl Education in a Patriarchal Society
Women lag behind in education in rural Pakistan. There are several barriers that limit girls’ educational attainment. While there is a paucity of credible research on girls’ education in rural Pakistan, existing studies identify three main barriers: cultural barriers, economic barriers and policy/state barriers. These barriers are further divided into sub-categories such as misinterpretation of religion, gender disparities, distance to school, mix-gendered schools, feudal culture, decision making, poverty, transportation, low educational budgets, powerful male characters in the curriculum and poor recruitment and retention of qualified female teachers. Despite these many obstacles, many interpretations of the problem of girls’ education point to Islam as the key barrier.

This paper makes the argument that it is the misinterpretation of Islam that has created many of these barriers. Acquisition of knowledge is equally important for both genders in Islam. Neither the Quran nor the narrations of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) discourage women’s education. This presentation concludes with recommendations on how to address these misinterpretations and suggestions to improve the equality of educational opportunities for females in rural Pakistan.

This presentation may be useful for the rural educators, researchers, international educators and educators who are interested in gender education.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, K-12 educators, Researchers

Speakers
avatar for Nadeem Saqlain

Nadeem Saqlain

Faculty of Education, Memorial University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 1:30pm - 2:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

International Field School Seminar: It Makes a Difference
International field schools provide rich, intensive opportunities for students to apply theory from previous courses in a completely different context. It is commonly understood that seminar is a place for students to discuss, question, explore and debate theory related to the discipline of study. Personal experience has underscored the importance of seminars to assist students to make sense and create understanding of what they are experiencing during an international field school.

This presentation will provide an overview of the opportunities and challenges that faculty and students face while participating in an international field school. Seminar takes on a dual purpose; it remains the environment to engage with theory and practice, but it also becomes the place where students can safely explore how cultural context, physical environment and changes in normal routines impact overall learning experiences.

Participants will explore the elements that influence seminar when the context for student learning is an international placement. Small group work will highlight some of the approaches and methods faculty can use to facilitate a higher level of understanding and meaning of course concepts when the international experience challenges the students both academically and personally.

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Hoot

Tracy Hoot

Associate Dean, Thompson Rivers University
Nursing
avatar for Donna Petri

Donna Petri

AVP Academic, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Reaching the Fringes: Does the confluence of live and online environments help a range of students achieve learning outcomes?
The Linear Algebra course for general science students at Carleton University has a yearly enrollment of at least 700. In addition, there are many students from other degree programs and the community, with diverse mathematical background and study skills, for whom the course is mandatory.

In this presentation, the participants will dive into the principles of mastery learning, motivation and gamification, as applied in this blended, large class, first-year math course designed to be effective, efficient and appealing. The weekly online quizzes provide opportunity for rapid data collection and analysis, thus enabling early identification of students at the fringes. This allows the instructor to reach out and provide early personal intervention and encouragement to these students via one-to-one interviews, while extending continuous support and positive feedback to students who are racing ahead. The in-person tutorials allow TAs to give immediate feedback on students’ work on the spot. The Ask the Instructor online forum becomes a central, transparent place of inquiry and reference to all students, replacing the inefficient email response system.

The collected online course participation data will be analyzed to support/dispute assumptions that, when both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is reinforced as the students engage in the mastery learning process, they procrastinate less, better solidify their knowledge and achieve course outcomes comparable to or better than the traditional live course.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Kevin Cheung

Dr. Kevin Cheung

Associate Professor, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Carleton University
avatar for Maristela Petrovic-Dzerdz (Carleton University)

Maristela Petrovic-Dzerdz (Carleton University)

Instructional Design Coordinator, Carleton University
Education, Pedagogy, Distance Education, Instructional Design


Wednesday May 14, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Development of a Mobile Procedure Logging Application to Enhance the Learner Experience
In 2004, the Post Graduate Medical Education Office (PGME) at the University of Toronto developed a procedure-logging system housed in POWER, the PGME central registration and evaluation system. It allowed learners to log their procedures completed during clinical training. It subsequently provided Program Directors with procedure completion rates and demographic information (i.e., where procedures are completed).

The application was developed by one PGME program (Internal Medicine). As a result, the application’s functionality did not meet the needs of every program. Moreover, no enhancements or updates had been made to the system since its implementation. The data entry component was very cumbersome and needed to be completed at a desktop often long after the procedure took place.

In September 2012, the POWER Steering Committee approved development of an updated, mobile friendly, procedure-logging system. In order to best meet the needs to learners and Program Directors, stakeholders were invited to four Procedure Log focus group meetings. Through these focus group meetings, universal key elements were identified and a framework was developed to give each program the flexibility to customize its procedure-logging system.

This project demonstrated a successful framework for gathering application requirements and a way to build flexibility to accommodate multiple programs. Since the release of this enhancement, more programs have also begun using the procedure-logging application. Informal feedback indicates that learners have been logging more procedures using the application on mobile devices.

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Alison Pattern

Alison Pattern

Project Manager, Learner Systems Integration - Post Graduate Medical Education, University of Toronto


Wednesday May 14, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Creating Demand for and Enabling Access to Your Online Degrees Across Global Borders
Your degrees can become accessible, worldwide.

Global demand for online and distance education is on the rise. Online education cannot only break down the barrier of rigidity and physical presence, but also those of student visas and long distances. With increasing competition in national markets, and tightened regulations, universities are increasingly looking for the right way to capitalize on this trend.

By showcasing user data from the world’s premier information portal on online and distance education, DistanceLearningPortal.com, this session will help universities to base their marketing decisions on hard facts instead of popular beliefs.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Rife

Patrick Rife

Director of University Value Americas, StudyPortals


Wednesday May 14, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
International Building, IB 2004 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:00pm PDT

Emerging Educational Technologies: Decision-Making Strategies for Diverse Learning Environments
With the ever-expanding range of emerging educational technologies that could be introduced to today’s learning environments, making evidence-based decisions about whether and how to best use such tools for instructional purposes is a critical yet challenging task. Yet, how can educators make informed decisions about using particular emerging technologies when, due to their relative newness, there is often a perceived lack of available and “up-to-the-minute” evidence?

Engaging with the conference theme of confluence and spaces, the goal of this session is to identify and propose practical solutions to several key problems regarding evidence-based decision making for technologies in what is commonly called the 21st century learning environment. Based on lessons learned from practice, the presenters will discuss how the concepts of convergence and affordances can be helpful in designing learning experiences, especially given the changing landscape of educational technologies. Learning outcomes include using strategies to mitigate a lack of up-to-date evidence when deciding whether or not to use new technologies in teaching and learning environments.

Using a real-world case study of integrating iPads within a library, the presenters will outline how 1) identifying aims and affordances and 2) using environmental scanning techniques can be applied to decision-making scenarios in different learning environments. The audience of this session is educators in various roles, including instructional designers, librarians and administrators. The presenters look forward to engaging the audience in discussion of contemporary issues surrounding instructional technology and decision making in this session.

Of Interest to: Instructional designers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Richard Hayman

Richard Hayman

Assistant Professor and Digital Initiatives Librarian, Mount Royal University
EE

Erika E. Smith

PhD Candidate, Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta
Educational technology and instructional designer for higher education.


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

2:30pm PDT

Break / Refreshment
Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:30pm - 2:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Rotunda 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Teaching with Digital Technologies: A Case Study using TPACK
The influence on education of technologies and the ever-expanding tools and resources of Web 2.0 and their learning spaces cannot be denied (Pollard & Pollard, 2004-05; Grant et al., 2006; JISC, 2009, Hung & Yuen, 2010). This is evidenced by growing numbers of online courses, increasing budgets for hardware and software, proliferation of educational technology corporations and abundance of digital technology use surveys and research studies. As a result of these technological developments, “higher education has a key role in helping students refine, extend and articulate the diverse range of skills they have developed through their experience of Web 2.0 technologies” (JISC 2009, p. 9).

This presentation will discuss what university instructors say about their experiences with and knowledge of digital technologies for teaching and learning and how digital technologies impact content, pedagogy and culture in higher education classrooms. The research data come from a review of the literature and a version of the Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) survey (Schmidt et al., 2009-10; used with permission) administered to instructors at our university, as well as face-to-face interviews. TPACK is a framework for both research and teaching that measures three domains of knowledge—content, pedagogy and technology—and their interconnectedness. The findings will contribute to the understanding of instructor competencies and shift in university culture required for full integration of technology with content and pedagogy and will inform future professional development activities at our institution.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Roberta Hammett

Roberta Hammett

Professor, Faculty of Education, Memorial University
PP

Pam Phillips

Senior Instructional Designer, CITL


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:45pm - 3:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Barriers to Using Technology in Teaching and Learning English as a foreign Language (EFL) in Saudi Arabia
Educational technology has been introduced in Saudi Arabia since 1980. In 2007, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia introduced the “Intel Teach for the Future program” to change the conventional educational system. Many English language teachers and English language learners are interested in using technology for language education. However, even with the introduction of the Intel program, still many teachers and students are encountering some obstacles that prevent them from integrating technology in classrooms. This presentation will explore the barriers that impede the use of technology for language learning. Various newspaper articles, government reports, refereed and non-refereed articles were studied. The findings indicate that lack of competence, lack of confidence, lack of time, lack of training for teachers and students, shortage of infrastructure and unavailability of Internet, lack of technical support and cultural beliefs block the use of technology for language learning in some rural areas. Some recommendations are made for integrating technology in language learning environments in Saudi Arabia.

This presentation is useful for researchers, K-12 educators, online distance educators, language teachers, educational technologists and especially for educators who are interested in international education or teaching in the Middle Eastern countries.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, K-12 educators, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Fawaz Alqarni

Fawaz Alqarni

PhD candidate, Faculty of Education, Memorial University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:45pm - 3:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Beyond the Walls: Meeting Library Learners Outside of Traditional Spaces
Students aren’t seeking out help from the library the way that most teachers and professors are traditionally familiar with. This declining trend in use is an internationally documented phenomenon, but we know that students still struggle in conducting library research, evaluating quality resources and using materials ethically. So how does a library help students who aren’t coming into the library?

We’ve responded by utilizing new technologies, new philosophies and new approaches in order to adapt to the changing dynamics of our learners. These include synchronous reference services, roving reference, embedded librarians in online courses and partnerships with unique campus learning communities. The need for strategic agility and ongoing review and analysis is one that is shared by educators in both virtual and face-to-face spaces.

Participants in this session, intended for post-secondary and high school educators, will find out what modern and responsive academic libraries are doing to support learners in a variety of environments. Participants will reflect on their own teaching space or classroom and how they can collaborate with librarians to bring innovative information literacy opportunities beyond the library’s traditional walls.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Gaynor

Kathy Gaynor

University Librarian, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Elizabeth Rennie

Elizabeth Rennie

Instruction & Research Librarian, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:45pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Educational Research via Playtesting

Educational research is supported by a well-defined collection of methodologies, but are there methodologies elsewhere that can provide fresh perspectives? The use of video games in learning is becoming more accepted, but are there other things we can learn from games?

Though there are fundamental differences between games and instruction, such as the fact that one seeks primarily to entertain and the other to enlighten or educate, it turns out that the practices, processes and theories behind playtesting games can in fact inform aspects of pedagogy—particularly those that relate to engagement.


In game design, the primary focus is on the player experience, and there has been considerable research into ways to assess and measure the player experience through playtesting. Playtesting is concerned with such things as whether or not the game is fun, which parts are too easy or hard, and whether and when people become bored. All of these properties have relevance to teaching and learning, even though they may not appear to be directly connected with meeting learning objectives. Rather, playtesting is concerned with the motivation of the player/student to continue the particular course of learning, which speaks to the success of the methodology in capturing the student's imagination. Sometimes, simply taking a novel approach to evaluation can yield insights that were not uncovered by more common approaches. This presentation will provide a brief overview of formal playtesting procedures and highlight ways these approaches could be used in the classroom as well as how this could inform pedagogy.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University
avatar for Jim Parker

Jim Parker

Professor, Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Calgary


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:45pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

A New Web-application for Grouping Students by Participation Behaviours
This session is to introduce a newly developed web-application, PartiMapper, which allows instructors to allocate students systematically and automatically into small groups in consideration of their participation behaviours revealed in discussion board.

Research has reported that systematic grouping is effective for better collaboration when students are allocated into heterogeneous groups taking account for personal profile, such as gender, languages, geographic locations, learning styles, personalities, prior course experience, grades, etc. These input variables can be used for grouping students systematically with survey questionnaires, pre-test, or academic records and some tools/web-applications are available for this method.

PartiMapper allocates individual students into groups based on group collaboration indices calculated from their participation behavior variables. Upon the assumption that participation behaviours reflect individuals’ diverse variables, we extract participation data of class discussion to allocate the students into groups. Variables entered in the algorithm of PartiMapper are:

  • Frequency: measured by number of postings
  • Earliness: revealed by the date and time of postings
  • Abundance: revealed by number of words in postings

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, post-secondary education, instructional designers, researchers, educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Sunah Cho

Sunah Cho

Centre for Teaching & Learning Technology, University of British Columbia
PhD
avatar for Namsook Jahng

Namsook Jahng

Centre for Teaching & Learning Technology, University of British Columbia
PhD
avatar for Bosung Kim

Bosung Kim

Centre for Teaching & Learning Technology, The University of British Columbia


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:45pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Multimodal Teaching and Learning in Diverse Classrooms
This presentation first discusses the challenges of today’s diverse classrooms (all levels) and the need for/benefits of multimodal teaching and learning. It then looks at various types of multimodal activities and assessments that enhance student engagement and academic success. Instructors are challenged to step out of their comfort zone and try new ways of delivering content and assessing students in order to assist them to successfully meet the learning outcomes of a course. Participants will be asked to participate in a few activities that require them to use multiple intelligences and brainstorm the use of multimodal strategies in their teaching, including presenting students with authentic, collaborative, problem-based activities and assessments.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Donna DesBiens

Donna DesBiens

Thompson Rivers University
I’ve been engaged in online learning since the late 90s, first as a student and then as a researcher, instructor and learning designer at the U of Calgary, SAIT and TRU. Till recently, I had only worked with closed learning platforms. Then I participated in a TOOC led by U Saskatchewan... Read More →
avatar for Gail Morong

Gail Morong

Instructional designer, Thompson Rivers University
Gail Morong is a Senior Instructional Designer with the Open Learning Division at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada. Her interest in equity and diversity issues informs her instructional design focus on interculturalization, internationalization and Indigenization... Read More →


Wednesday May 14, 2014 2:45pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

3:15pm PDT

Innovative ID practices to support the creation of successful learning spaces
Over a number of years, a team of educators created a large number of online courses across a number of academic disciplines. This team was tasked with designing and developing highly engaging, cohort-based courses for degree, certificate and diploma programs. Key components of the process were the use of literature-supported instructional design practices and an integrated team of instructional designers, editors, course production technicians and course writers. The courses were created to promote student success, to coincide with the eCampus Alberta Essential Quality Standards and to provide opportunities for students outside of normal business hours and the universities’ traditional catchment area.

The result of this was the creation of a collection of engaging, interactive, fully online courses that use existing online tools in innovative ways to promote successful learning spaces for students and instructors. In theory, the application of informed instructional design practices has allowed for new learning opportunities. This has presented further insights that may lead to a further refinement of instructional design concepts and their application with post-secondary online courses. In practice, this demonstrates the potential usefulness of online tools whose use has often become mundane and commonplace.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional Designers, Educational Technologists

Speakers
avatar for Doug Reid

Doug Reid

Operational Coordinator, eLearning Design and Delivery, MacEwan University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 3:15pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

3:15pm PDT

Lessons Learned: Working with Interpreters
“Have you ever thought about leading a field school course with Canadian students in a country where the day-to-day language is not English? Have you wondered how students would engage with the local population when they do not speak the same language and engagement is essential to the course learning outcomes? Have you considered the use of interpreters to overcome the language barrier and wondered how it will impact student learning, course outcomes and the overall experience?

Students within the BScN program at Thompson Rivers University have the opportunity to take international field school courses where English is not the first language of the population. During this presentation we will discuss our experience of working with interpreters in a community development course in Nicaragua. Participants will be introduced to the following elements that should be considered when working with interpreters: selection of interpreters, preparation of students to work with interpreters, introduction of interpreters to the course concepts and purpose and the navigation of challenging situations. We will highlight the ups and downs of working with interpreters from the perspectives of the students, faculty and interpreters.

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Hoot

Tracy Hoot

Associate Dean, Thompson Rivers University
Nursing
avatar for Donna Petri

Donna Petri

AVP Academic, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 14, 2014 3:15pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8
 
Thursday, May 15
 

8:00am PDT

Breakfast
Thursday May 15, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

8:00am PDT

Registration and Information Table Open
Thursday May 15, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

8:00am PDT

Vendor Showcase
Thursday May 15, 2014 8:00am - 4:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

9:00am PDT

Keynote: Nancy White
Speakers
avatar for Nancy White

Nancy White

Learner, Practitioner, Grandmother, Full Circle Associates
Learner, gramma, chocoholic, visual practitioner, facilitator/process geek, consultant, learner… did I say learner yet?


Thursday May 15, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

10:00am PDT

Break / Refreshment
Thursday May 15, 2014 10:00am - 10:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

A Framework of Enablers: Architects of Learning

Concerns about the slow adoption of technology by teachers are not new, and rapid technological changes have increased the likelihood that teachers will have to grapple with unfamiliar technology. This presentation highlights for K-12 educators a framework of enablers for teachers to make sense of their experience with new and emerging technology. It is taken from the study, “Unfamiliar Technology and the Architect of Learning: A Case Study.” This framework outlines characteristics of internal affordance (teacher capacity), external affordances including dynamic professional development experiences, a collaborative culture of lifelong learning and inevitable constraints with something new. Constraints were not seen as barriers in opposition to the enablers. The study found limitations of time, infrastructure and opportunities for teacher learning challenged the teachers to engage with unfamiliar technology. The data also revealed a personal capacity to be open to the possibility that a new technology might present and a strong supportive ecosystem had a powerful impact in facilitating the process of sense making. A constructivist teaching and learning environment invited teachers as participants in the process of learning. As participants the teachers had the capacity to act within their environment, thus the weight of the constraints was diminished. The study also concluded that teachers who do not have the opportunity to see themselves as learners will find it more and more difficult to cope with the endlessly changing landscape influenced by educational technology. Teachers will benefit from participating in building personal pathways for making sense of new and emerging technology.

 

Of Interest to: K-12 educators, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Nancy Stuewe

Nancy Stuewe

Educational Technology, University of Calgary
I have recently retired from teaching and learning with the Calgary Board of Education. I have been an elementary classroom teacher; a learning leader to support 21st century learning, a teacher technologist and most recently enjoyed a learning commons role. I am also a graduate of... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Text Design for Online Learning: What has the research revealed and what remains hidden

The world of online learning is evolving at an increasing rate, particularly in the number and variety of access modes available to students and instructors. In a world where online learning is accessed via screens both small and large, design research for the most commonly use media—text—is relatively sparse. In this presentation, existing research supporting text design decisions for online learning is summarized, gaps identified and implications for new and emerging distribution technologies discussed.

This presentation will benefit instructional designers and instructors who design their own online courses in making informed decisions about the design of text and textual elements. Attendees will be able to identify best practices supported by research for several aspects of online text design. They will be able to consider the relative abundance or scarcity of research evidence supporting specific choices, and they will be able to relate how this research might be interpreted to support mobile and other emerging display devices.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists.


Speakers
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Instructional Designer, Distance Education Services, University of Victoria
Open Learning Faculty Member, Thompson Rivers University


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Education and Industry Partnerships

Alberta Distance Learning Centre (ADLC) is working in partnership with the Woodland Operations Learning Foundation (WOLF) to deliver an innovative experience that combines face-to-face and distance delivery modes of education in providing a course that offers students both an academic and a vocational experience. The program combines online courses with industry simulators and a field experience to create a rich, multi-layered learning experience. ADLC has produced and has available five online Forestry courses. Also, ADLC offers a project course which extends and enhances competencies from the online courses in a flexible way. In addition, we offer a three-day camp experience led by forestry industry experts.

Students can develop competence in the area of Harvest Equipment Simulator Operation with time spent using WOLF simulators. The simulators are delivered and set up in schools for a one-week period and are supervised by and an industry specialist.

The ADLC field experience program allows students to earn high school credit. The Natural Sciences Field School program requires students and teachers to spend three days in a forested wilderness environment. This is an example of experiential learning at its best and nurtures the whole child. It enhances students' capacity for achieving their full potential—intellectually, physically, socially, spiritually and emotionally. The camp program incorporates:

  • leadership skills
  • communication skills
  • anti-bullying
  • respect for the environment (which then spills over to respect in other aspects in life)
  • hands-on, relevant and interesting curriculum
  • 3 credits in 3 days and a 4th credit as a project
  • self confidence in life skills

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, K-12 educators, Educational technologists, Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Gary Frederickson

Gary Frederickson

Learning Network Liaison, Adlc Lethbridge


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Quality is a Team Effort! – Quality Assurance in Collaborative Online Course Development Environments

It is widely agreed that “Quality Matters” when it comes to online course development. While many excellent rubrics and models have emerged in recent years to support quality in online learning, implementing these models is not always as straightforward as it seems. With the growing practice of Universal Design for Learning and, in certain jurisdictions, the roll out of accessibility compliance requirements, additional elements of review have become critical. How can quality assurance be carried out effectively in contexts where multiple players such as faculty/instructors, instructional designers, multimedia developers and more are involved in the creation and delivery of online courses?

This presentation will offer insights into how the Digital Education Strategies team at The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University, has risen to the challenge of quality assurance in a dynamic team environment that produces up to 30 courses per semester. The team’s Quality Assurance/Quality Control process will be shared, including roles and responsibilities and strategies for ensuring as effective practice as possible. By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify possible strategies for supporting quality assurance in their own institutions’ online courses and how to assist all team members in optimal fulfillment of their roles.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists, Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Maureen Glynn

Maureen Glynn

Instructional Designer, Digital Education Strategies, Ryerson University
Working as Instructional Designer with Digital Education Strategies at The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University, since 2010, Maureen has supported the development of over 50 online courses across 5 program areas. She is a co-developer and facilitator... Read More →
avatar for Leonora Zefi

Leonora Zefi

Manager, eLearning Initiatives and Course Development, Digital Education Strategies, The G. Raymond Chang School of Cont, Ryerson University


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Open Online Course Design and Development: Challenges and Promises

Open online course design and development is now part of the higher education landscape of some institutions. The presenters were involved in an Open Educational Resource university (OERu) redevelopment project that involved the adaptation and customization of an existing introductory open art course so that a new open online course could be made available to OERu partners and any interested learners globally. ART 100: Art Appreciation and Techniques was repurposed from open educational resources (OERs) made available by the Saylor Foundation and has been redesigned with the intent of making it more flexible for reuse, redistribution, revision and remixing for different users and contexts. A big part of the course redevelopment project was to pilot the use of MediaWiki as both a development and a publishing platform for open distributed learning. Technical barriers and other challenges made the project more difficult than originally anticipated. Väljataga, T., Põldoja, H., & Laanpere, M. (2011, p. 67) point out that, “although open online course design solves many educational problems and challenges, at the same time it also creates new ones.” In this workshop, we will discuss several critical technological, and other, considerations and challenges of designing and developing a course for open online delivery, using OER. We will also outline some of the promises of such a venture.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Irwin DeVries

Irwin DeVries

Adjunct Faculty, Education, Thompson Rivers University
Open educator, musician, semi-retired from Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning and now teaching part time for TRU and Royal Roads University.
avatar for Gail Morong

Gail Morong

Instructional designer, Thompson Rivers University
Gail Morong is a Senior Instructional Designer with the Open Learning Division at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada. Her interest in equity and diversity issues informs her instructional design focus on interculturalization, internationalization and Indigenization... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Banishing misconceptions: The confluence of formative assessment, multimedia learning, and conceptual change

Stubborn misconceptions are common in many fields of study. They are the 'devils in the details' that inhibit a deeper understanding of a given subject. This presentation will explore the networked nature of learning and how the combination of formative quizzes and short online videos can be used to alter relationships among basic knowledge elements in order to banish misconceptions involving more complex topics.

Learners are first alerted to the existence of misconceptions in their own thinking by means of brief formative assessments. Learners are then directed to short online videos which address the misconceptions. This feedback-corrective procedure can have the effect of reconfiguring knowledge elements in the schemata of individual learners, which can then lead to deeper understanding of a topic.

The presentation is suitable for all educators and especially for distance learning faculty and course developers. At the end of the presentation participants will be able to:

 

  1. Appraise the value of formative assessments for identifying misconceptions;
  2. Understand how to implement short online videos as follow-up correctives; and
  3. Describe how knowledge elements are related according to schema theory.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers

Speakers
avatar for J. M. Ramey

J. M. Ramey

Distance Education Coordinator, Northeast State Community College
I'm passionate about innovative approaches to facilitate deeper learning.


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:45am PDT

Claiming Space: Adult Female Learners' Return to Post-Secondary Education

As Canadian post-secondary institutions grapple with declining enrollments within the traditional student demographic, many are actively discussing the multi-faceted concepts of student engagement, support and persistence. The present study focused on female adult learners, a demographic that is growing at Canadian institutions and one that will become more critical as the traditional 18–25 age group shrinks as a proportion of post-secondary enrollment. This study examined the lived experience of seven adult female learners as they (re)engaged with post-secondary education at a mid-sized western Canadian university, using the metaphor of claiming one’s space and, through this, the building of campus community. The study provided an opportunity for students to express themselves in their own words over a 13 week period and permitted an in-depth examination of how they constructed their learning experiences and own identities. Using van Manen’s approach to phenomenological hermeneutics, the study emphasized the interpretive analysis of actual life texts, writing as research and the development of pedagogical competence. The results produced three main themes of motion, emotion and connection. The implications of these findings were discussed for students, educators and researchers, with strategies for supporting the transformative learning experiences, and the subsequent claim on cultural space, for female adult students within post-secondary settings.

 

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, Researchers, Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Jan Duerden

Jan Duerden

Lecturer, English and Modern Languages, Thompson Rivers University


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:45am PDT

Collaborative & Creative Educational Relationships: Redesigning Human Development Curriculum for Distance Learning

This presentation will focus on the redesign of the Human Development distance learning course for social work students. Two faculty members from the School of Social Work & Human Service collaborated on the project as curriculum developer and consultant to revise and update the course. This redesign was informed by a need to update curriculum to reflect cultural diversity and difference, as well as to locate educational materials within local, national and international arenas. To achieve these aims, we used a variety of online approaches to our material: first, we used two textbooks—one a standard Canadian human development text, the other an Aboriginal approach to women’s development. These textbooks were supplemented by local author Richard Wagamese’s Indian Horse, a fictional account of the impact of residential school on an Aboriginal boy’s development. Other innovative approaches included a lengthy interview with Richard Wagamese discussing Aboriginal development and the cultural impacts of colonialism, and short videos from the textbook focusing on intercultural and intracultural differences on human development themes. Curriculum designers, consultants, educators and administrators will be invited to discuss the challenges and possible solutions to incorporating differing worldviews and diversity within curriculum development.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists


Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Murphy

Jennifer Murphy

School of Social Work and Human Service, Faculty of Human, Social and Educational Development, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Jeanette Robertson

Jeanette Robertson

Associate Professor, Thompson Rivers University
Jeanette Robertson is currently serving as the Program Coordinator of the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Degree program at TRU. Since faculty in 1998, she has taught a number of courses including Human Development, Disability Studies, Canadian Social Policy, Research, Theory and Ideology... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

11:15am PDT

Break
Thursday May 15, 2014 11:15am - 11:30am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Designing for Learner Motivation in an Online Environment

In 2011, a course design pilot project was started for Athabasca University courses in the School of Computing and Information Systems (SCIS), building on a development pilot initiated after a program review. The goal was to share an understanding of theory and effective practice for online learning and to develop guidelines to facilitate creative design and solution finding. At that time all SCIS courses were developed using one HTML design template. Initial changes were made to give each course its own visual identity and add course-specific resources. The next level of the design pilot looked for more effective ways to present content in the form of learning activities. 



In 2013, a formative evaluation was undertaken of the content and presentation of courses and of the design process, with the goal of informing improvements in both courses and process. Each faculty member who participated in the pilot provided his perspective on design choices made to engage students in an online learning environment. The coordinator and course author, Terry Taylor, who was interviewed for this study, used some particularly innovative ways to convey content, and the evaluation team wished to know more about his approach to motivating learners. He was interviewed about his design strategies for online courses to support learner motivation. The results presented here shed light on his successful design process. The intended audience is learning designers and faculty designing online courses.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers

Speakers
CB

Corinne Bossé

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
avatar for Cindy Ives

Cindy Ives

Director, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
avatar for Mary Pringle

Mary Pringle

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
In a world filled with tools, needs, and potential, I try every day to discover what learners already know, what motivates them to learn, how they can best learn with the resources that the course design team can make available to them, and how to demonstrate to learners and administrators... Read More →
avatar for Terry Taylor

Terry Taylor

Academic Coordinator, School of Computing and Information Systems, Athabasca University


Thursday May 15, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Implementation of a new learning space for creative and collaborative learning

In November 2013 a new learning space, called the Discovery Centre, was opened in the MacOdrum Library at Carleton University, as part of the library’s renovations. This learning space was designed to provide a flexible environment with furnishings that allowed for easy reconfiguration, especially for group work. The 9,500 sq ft space included features such as large screen displays for easy switching between multiple laptop displays and treadmill desks. Besides the main open floor space there are three adjacent rooms, a gaming laboratory, a multi-media laboratory and a learning laboratory. The gaming lab has two gaming stations and two 3D printers. The multi-media lab has a large screen (approx. 18ft x 5ft). The learning lab provides an innovative classroom for 24 students (6 at 4 tables) that has an instructor’s screen projected onto two opposing walls, as well as a display at each of the four tables that allows 4 connections from laptops or tablets to the display screen. This presentation will examine the design and implementation of this new learning space, as well as the findings from running the space for six months. Details on the variety of uses of the space will be included. The presentation will be of interest to anyone involved in constructing and using learning spaces, including instructors, facilities managers, teaching and learning centres, administrators and librarians. The learning outcomes will be the knowledge of the furniture, technology and uses of a new learning space.

 

Of Interest to: K-12 educators, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Alan L. Steele

Alan L. Steele

Director, Discovery Centre - Office of the Provost and Vice-President Academic, Carleton University


Thursday May 15, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Structured Student Interactions

Interaction in one of several different modes (student-student, student-content or student-teacher) seems to be a necessary condition for student learning to take place. One way to promote positive student interactions and deep approaches to learning is to offer a structured ‘study buddy’ activity where students review each others' assignments prior to the assignment deadline. Deep approaches to learning are characterized by the appropriate use of high-level cognitive skills for tasks which require them. Students taking a deep approach seek to understand ideas in context and apply their learning to other concepts. Instructional designers, K-12 teachers and higher education faculty will understand deep and surface approaches to learning, why they are not the same as ‘learning styles’ and how student interactions can be structured to promote deeper approaches in a socially engaging context.

 

This will be a relatively high level overview of my MEd thesis with interaction coming from the participants in the form of questions and comments.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Colin Madland

Colin Madland

Manager, Online Shenanigans, Trinity Western University


Thursday May 15, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Gamification: A Different Paradigm of Pedagogy

In a recent online presentation, Charles M. Reigeluth said that the future of Ed Tech would require a change of the paradigm of pedagogy. Gamification, the use of game elements in non-game contexts, is one such new pedagogy that can be implemented without the need for institutional systemic change. Since the term’s first appearance in 2006, it has become a trending topic on many education forums. This presentation reports on the gamification of two university courses: one a graduate-level education course and the other a freshman computer course.

Reigeluth’s requirements for a new paradigm include a requirement for attainment-based, continuous student progress that is learner-centered, personalized and self-directed. Gamification, done right, is all those things.

The Gamification Paradigm includes:

 

  1. Strict cumulative grading;
  2. More tasks to choose from than needed for a perfect score;
  3. Flexible path through content to demonstrate objectives;
  4. Attainment-base student progress;
  5. Criterion-referenced assessment.

 

This presentation will explain the structure of the courses that were taught, highlight successes and failures, and conclude with strategies that can be used to incorporate meaningful gamification into existing courses.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University


Thursday May 15, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Bootstrapping Quality by Design

Describing, supporting and ensuring “quality” in online learning initiatives remains an ongoing challenge for the public higher education sector. This session will present a range of nimble strategies that aim to leverage existing university resources to improve quality during the design phase. The exploration of these strategies will be of interest to administrators, instructional designers, educational technologies and champions of online learning. As our paradigms for teaching and learning are shifting, so must our conception of online course design process within the university organization. While many of us have expertise in supporting high quality instructional design, what is equally important is development of a tool kit for knowledge mobilization that leverages products, events and networks for broader impact. In addition to providing guidance in the areas of learning theory and design process models, we are asked to support more comprehensive institutional strategies to ensure the quality of our online offerings.

 

During this session examples speaking to a range of online learning contexts, including fully online, hybrid and MOOC initiatives will be shared. Participants in this session will be provided with a framework for “scaffolding” quality in the design phase as part of overall capacity development strategy within an existing institutional structure and culture. By artfully amplifying the approaches necessary within a single course, we can make this work visible and replicable within our community or institution.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Harrison

Laurie Harrison

Director - Online Learning Strategies, University of Toronto
Experiential learning


Thursday May 15, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Adventures in Virtual Space: Using Google Maps Engine Lite and YouTube for Community Building and Scaffolding in an International Community Development Online Course

INTS 3331: International Community Development is an online course that has been running at Mount Royal University for approximately ten years. The adoption of Google Apps by Mount Royal University, and the opportunity to redevelop the course, allowed for a re-imagining of how students could connect with each other, successfully achieve the course outcomes and stretch their creativity. The redeveloped course was launched in January 2014.

Upon completion of the session participants will be able to:

  • Determine whether Google Maps Engine Lite or YouTube are appropriate vehicles for community building in your own courses
  • Anticipate the levels of student support required for these activities to be successful
  • Imagine possibilities for creating similar activities and assessments in your own courses

 

In our presentation, we would like to share with you our scholarly reflections on how the community-building exercises set the stage for students’ exploration of the field of ICD, as well as provided success and practice for building online “artifacts” as part of their assessment in the course. If you have a laptop, please bring it to the session. Wifi will be available at the conference.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Anderson

Carolyn Anderson

Associate Professor, Field Director 1st Year Practicum - Department of Social Work and Disability Studies Faculty of Com, Mount Royal University
avatar for Pattie Mascaro

Pattie Mascaro

Instructional Design Consultant, Academic Development Centre, Mount Royal University


Thursday May 15, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
International Building, IB 2004 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

The Effectiveness of University of Regina Faculty of KHS Courses Offered by Different Modalities – Blended and Fully Online

The Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Regina offered two blended courses as a pilot. Up to 50 per cent of the course was done face-to-face in the classroom and the remaining time was done online in an LMS. There were two reasons for the pilot: 1) to test the notion that blended learning equals improved learning as compared to face-to-face alone; and 2) more efficient use of classroom space where the face-to-face component of both classes was taught using only one classroom, essentially halving the classroom usage. This process is being repeated for two more courses in Winter 2014. If this works, it could be scaled up to help alleviate classroom pressures on campus.

Since all four blended courses were also developed and delivered fully online, ongoing research has compared the effectiveness of each delivery mode. Some factors that will be considered in the research include but are not limited to: 1) student academic performance—assignment and final grades, assignment completion rates and retention; 2) student and instructor satisfaction or perception; 3) level of student support for each delivery mode (instructor and other support); 4) student profiles in each mode of delivery which could factor into this; 5) costs and time spent on designing and delivering/teaching each delivery mode; 6) and a detailed description of what constitutes each mode of delivery (how each course is designed and taught). The presentation will provide some preliminary research results.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Administrators

Speakers

Thursday May 15, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

Innovating and Enhancing Online Marked Writing Exercises

This presentation will demonstrate an innovative, time-saving implementation for distance and open education online self-paced Spanish courses offered online by Athabasca University (AU) and delivered through Moodle. Spanish courses have always had very high enrollments, and their tutors have heavy workloads. As in any language course, an important amount of Spanish students’ learning takes place through the tutor marked written exercises (TMWEs). Traditionally, these assignments include many questions and sub-questions with variable answers, which meant they had to be graded manually. Previously, students were doing their TMWEs on paper or as Word files that went back and forth by post mail or by email, which made the grading work very laborious and repetitive. To overcome the bottleneck, we designed a new way to implement and automate the delivery and marking of Spanish courses in Moodle that eases the tutors’ marking burden by around 65 per cent. The time thus gained can now be used to guide students in other ways. Since question types in Moodle are somehow limited, we used Hot Potatoes to produce many other types of questions that can be imported and included into Moodle quizzes. This new method is being used successfully across all Spanish courses and now is being introduced to other language courses successfully. We are now enhancing and refining this successful method.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Luis Guadarrama

Luis Guadarrama

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
luisg@athabascau.ca (Work) luismx66@gmail.com (Personal) Luis Guadarrama completed his MA Educational Technology at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. Working in Mexican and Canadian universities, Guadarrama is currently a Learning Designer at Athabasca University, where... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

A doctoral readiness application (the Dr. App): Tracking preparation, time-to-completion, and success of doctoral students in Canada and abroad
This presentation is intended to describe a research project that aims to examine the preparedness and preconceptions of potential online doctoral students by offering a free web application, the Dr. App, that will track students’ responses to reflective questions about their readiness for doctoral studies. The system is being designed to collect user demographics, activity patterns and question responses but will only export reports on consenting participants. The project will also involve interviews with potential students.
This project is intended to develop the basis for a longitudinal study of learner readiness, preparation, completion rates and time-to-completion of project participants.

“Attrition from doctoral programs can be a serious issue in terms of human and national investment and research capacity building in contemporary economies” (Kiley & Wisker, 2009). Studies on full time doctoral students in Canada, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States have revealed that between 30 to 70 percent complete their degrees within a 10-year period (Canadian Association for Graduate Studies, 2004; Bourke, Holbrook, Lovat, & Farley, 2004; Higher Education Funding Council for England, 2007; Council of Graduate Schools in the United States, 2008). These statistics, however, only account for those who graduate. Elgar’s (2003) completion statistics indicate that only 50 percent of doctoral students actually graduate at all. The Dr. App is aimed at assisting potential doctoral students to examine their current life situations, their academic backgrounds and the demands of their professional positions in order to effectively strategize, get their finances in order and develop support networks.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Researchers, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Marguerite Koole

Marguerite Koole

Instructional Media Analyst, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University


Thursday May 15, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:30pm PDT

Canadian Network for Innovation In Education AGM
Thursday May 15, 2014 12:30pm - 1:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

12:30pm PDT

Lunch
Thursday May 15, 2014 12:30pm - 1:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

eVIP: Electronic Virtual Patients

The training of healthcare professionals has traditionally been based on substantial direct student–patient contact. Effective practitioners need to be able to apply reasoning skills gained from exposure to a variety of cases in order to develop diagnostic and therapeutic accuracy.

Virtual patients can provide students with a reliable, safe and replicable environment to practice diagnostic skills and develop clinical reasoning. In particular, virtual patients have demonstrated their use in healthcare teaching, learning and assessment and throughout a wide range of designs for learning.

While virtual patients are a useful component of healthcare education, they are seldom affordable. The range of virtual patients being produced is limited, with many essentially automated versions of problem-based learning (PBL) cases. These cases only proceed in a single direction, which prevents users from tracking down ‘wrong paths’ by immediate correction. This inflexibility limits the development of clinical reasoning, and is both unrealistic and unengaging. In real life there are often several ways to tackle a problem, but such multiple route scenarios can be very time consuming to model.

This presentation will demonstrate how UNBC is employing open source platform OpenLabyrinth https://github.com/olab/Open-Labyrinth/wiki to build online virtual patients. The development methods employ visual thinking and concept mapping techniques that are accessible, yet flexible enough to simulate real clinical decisions through non-linear pathways.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Grant Potter

Grant Potter

Instructional Designer, UNBC
Pappy with the Khaki sweatbandBowed goat potbellied barnyard that only he noticedThe old fart was smartThe old gold cloth madonnaDancin’ t’ the fiddle ‘n sawHe ran down behind the knoll‘n slipped on his wooden fishheadThe mouth worked ‘n snapped all the beesBack t’ the... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Organizational Cultures and Training Innovation: First responders web training

It is becoming increasingly apparent that police officers, firefighters, medical personnel and other first-responders need improved trauma resilience skills in order to cope effectively with the many challenges encountered during traumatic emergency situations. There is growing evidence that trauma can have a long-term health impact on these workers. One of those impacts is the development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD is an anxiety disorder that can develop following the stress of emergency situations. In the framework of the first responders’ culture, where emergencies are the priority and finding time for training is sometimes almost impossible, the idea of providing online learning opportunities for training in the area of trauma resilience was analyzed and implemented.

A multidisciplinary group integrating police officers, firefighters and paramedics was linked together with instructional designers, multimedia developers and research experts to design and determine the effectiveness of online training for trauma resilience. Once the web course was developed, its efficiency was tested by a group of first responders across Canada. This presentation will share the amazing findings of this case study, the challenges of developing online learning resources for trauma resilience, the impact of the first responders’ culture on training possibilities online and the limits and opportunities of online learning for mental health in general, and for trauma resilience in particular. The audience will be able to learn from the experience and build bridges between this case study and similar training possibilities for mental health and other similar disciplines.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Program developers, instructional designers, LMS administrators and IT.               

Speakers
avatar for Martha Burkle

Martha Burkle

Instructor, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for Michael Magee

Michael Magee

Consultant, Graffiti Comet


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Using Google Dynamic Maps for Enriching Cooperative Learning Experiences

Human Geography 302 is an online, self-paced, undergraduate, three-credit course in human geography offered at Athabasca University. It is suitable for students who are interested in the vast geography, culture and sustainable development of Canada’s North. Regardless of the rich and diverse content of the course, students tend to focus their attention on a small geographical area they select to conduct their work, but do not expand their learning experience to other areas. However, this course was completely redesigned recently. The use of Google dynamic maps, which is one of the most significant new elements integrated in the course, aims to diversify and enrich students’ learning.

Coordinated by tutors and based on cooperative learning strategies, students across groups use and share the same online dynamic map to post assignments produced throughout the course. These assignments reflect the central discussions in the course and let students integrate a multidisciplinary analysis of a particular geographical area. Instructions for assignments are designed so that students’ outcomes are different from one another’s. There is a public approval process for assignments in which tutors ensure the focus and perspective of a student’s assignment differs from those of other students. In this way assignments shared publicly don’t pose any opportunity for copying or cheating. The approval process involves having students reading and analyzing assignments submitted previously. This cooperative learning strategy aims to expand, diversify and enrich students’ learning experience. It also provides students with an excellent opportunity for learning from one another.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Luis Guadarrama

Luis Guadarrama

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
luisg@athabascau.ca (Work) luismx66@gmail.com (Personal) Luis Guadarrama completed his MA Educational Technology at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. Working in Mexican and Canadian universities, Guadarrama is currently a Learning Designer at Athabasca University, where... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

4 Pillars of DGBL: A Structured Rating System for Games for Learning

Video games are interactive by nature—people proceed in games by doing things, and this experiential quality lies at the very core of game design. Without interaction, it isn’t a game. Video games are popular precisely because of the experience—games designed for learning can do no less. However, to be feasible for use in formal educational settings, they must do more, and while we are making progress studying games in classrooms, there remain few structured approaches to analysing games that do not include classroom testing.

 

This presentation will outline the author’s Four Pillars of Game-Based Learning and show examples of how they can be used to perform a structured analysis of both COTS and serious games to assess whether or not a game has potential for use in the classroom.

 

These four pillars are:

  1.  Gameplay - How is it as a game? Is it fun? Is it Interesting? How does it measure up esthetically?
  2. Educational Content - Are there one or more recognizable educational objectives, discernible either from the game itself or from the accompanying support materials.
  3. Teacher Support - Is there adequate teacher support to make it viable for use in a formal setting?
  4. Balance - This section examines the game through the lens of the Magic Bullet model to see how well the various learning elements are balanced.

 

Together these four pillars highlight the key issues associated with the use of games in the classroom.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Making Space for Intellectual Estuaries

In nature, estuaries are meeting places. Fresh water, salt water and land come together, enabling productivity and biodiversity that is greater than the sum of its parts. Similarly, university faculty members and learning and development professionals may be able to create—or enable the creation of—what I refer to as “intellectual estuaries.” These spaces bring together often-unlikely groups of people for learning that can be greater than the sum of the knowledge they bring. The presenter has developed this concept over several years of research and practice. Design of these spaces involves boundary spanning or blurring, openness to possibility, productive tensions and inherent ambiguities. Intellectual estuary design is to traditional instructional design what the un-conference is to the conference. Examples will be shared from experience at Fielding Graduate University, where Malcolm Knowles was a founding faculty member, from Royal Roads University and from consulting practice. After introducing the concepts and examples, there will be round table sessions in which individuals can begin to apply the ideas to their own contexts.

 

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists


Speakers
avatar for Sylvia Currie

Sylvia Currie

Learning and Teaching, BCcampus
I'm part of the professional learning team at BCcampus. Talk to me about facilitating learning online, social learning, learning communities, facilitating in the open, communities of practice, and dogs :)
avatar for Alice MacGillivray

Alice MacGillivray

Alice MacGillivray, Consultant and Associate Faculty Member, Royal Roads University
I am an independent consultant and faculty member, based on Gabriola Island in B.C. Some of my most durable interests include leadership, formal and informal learning, and work in complex systems. Much of my work is informed by principles from natural systems. I have designed several... Read More →
avatar for Nancy White

Nancy White

Learner, Practitioner, Grandmother, Full Circle Associates
Learner, gramma, chocoholic, visual practitioner, facilitator/process geek, consultant, learner… did I say learner yet?


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Modernization of the Individual Training and Education System / Le Campus des Forces armées canadiennes : apprentissage sans frontière

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members are amongst the best trained military personnel in the world. This strategic advantage has consistently enabled the CAF to excel during all types of operations. The challenge is to maintain this advantage in the face of resource constraints and an increasingly complex and challenging security environment.

CAF Campus represents a fundamental shift from the traditional IT&E paradigm and is the first systemic rationalization of the IT&E system in the CAF’s history. Displacing the stovepiped approach of the current system, it empowers leadership at all levels and enables the strategic synchronization of plans, opportunities and investments to improve IT&E while reducing the burden on personnel and resources.

CAF Campus will initiate a culture of continuous improvement and deliberate, coordinated analysis to ensure the sustained effectiveness and efficiency of the IT&E system. Innovative approaches that fuse modern methodologies with the latest technology-enabled IT&E solutions will accelerate learning, improve retention, encourage critical thinking and enable easy access to realistic IT&E at the point of need. The improved efficiencies made possible by the implementation of CAF Campus will produce effects well beyond the IT&E system, including improvements to capability development and reduction of the overall operations and maintenance burden. CAF Campus will facilitate the goals of our members who embrace self-improvement and who have been limited by the current IT&E system. It also capitalizes on integration with collective training, joint training and all four pillars of the CAF Professional Development System, while making the best use of every training dollar.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists


Speakers
avatar for Marc Imbeault

Marc Imbeault

Dean of Studies and Research, Royal Military College
avatar for Deborah Miller

Deborah Miller

Performance Innovations, Department of National Defence, Canadian Defence Academy


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Innovative Assessments for the 21st Century

The purpose of this workshop is to explore innovative assessments that will help students to develop 21st century skills. Participants will be introduced to some key assessment terms, including formative and summative assessment, as well as the difference between assessment and evaluation. A variety of non-traditional assessments will be addressed, with a focus on those that use digital tools such as blogs, e-portfolios, wikis, social media and multimedia projects. Participants will also be introduced to some best practices for marking a variety of assignments, such as the creation of rubrics that specifically link to learning outcomes. Participants will leave with some practical ideas for creating engaging formative and summative assessments that will allow students to demonstrate their learning in innovative ways.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Warnock

Kelly Warnock

Instructional Designer, Open Learning – Instructional Design Group, Thompson Rivers University
Kelly Warnock is an Instructional Designer at Thompson Rivers University. She has taught in BC and internationally, with experiences ranging from teaching elementary school, to ESL university classes, to training faculty.


Thursday May 15, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
International Building, IB 2004 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:00pm PDT

The Places, Spaces, and Cultures of Applied Learning—Understanding student use of technology in an applied institution and what it means for innovation

For many years, JIBC has been guided by an applied learning model that has resulted in a healthy use of simulations, exercises and role-plays in the design and delivery of its programs. However, when learning technology is thrown into mix it presents certain challenges to maintaining an experiential learning environment since many mainstream technologies (e.g., LMSes) are better suited to delivering content-driven courses characteristic of more traditional university programs. At JIBC, this challenge is compounded by a highly focused institutional mandate, coupled with a less traditional student body whose learning experiences transverse institutional, workplace and simulated places. This presentation will discuss findings from a JIBC student use of technology study that looked at formal and informal uses of technology, and how this informs (and doesn’t inform) learning technologies and innovation at our institution.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & In, JIBC


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:00pm PDT

25 Dynamic Teaching Strategies to Engage Your Online Students

What better way than online learning to support the student motivated to gain an education who is unable attend a traditional classroom. Thanks to the growing accessibility of the Internet, we can reach out to students residing in the remote corners of our world as well as those in the military or in the resource industries.

As educators we have the opportunity to provide education that is meaningful, relevant and readily available. Students studying online need our support on how to navigate our courses and participate in the discussion forums. We have the capacity to assist students to build their own online communities that will enhance and enrich their learning experiences.

The purpose of this presentation is to provide strategies and promote discussion that will facilitate online teaching skills based on the findings of a larger study undertaken to explore and describe the strategies and resources that nursing students used in their online learning. The students in the research study identified what they perceived as effective teaching that supported their learning. This presentation will address these findings, such as how to get your students connected online, how to develop discussion forums that stimulate learning and how to manage the online environment to enhance and support your teaching.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Kim Munich

Kim Munich

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Kim Munich is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, Canada. Dr. Munich’s year career began with nursing clients in medical-surgical wards, Neuro ICU, extended care, community, and especially maternal/child high risk obstetrics... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:30pm PDT

Break / Refreshment
Thursday May 15, 2014 2:30pm - 2:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Toward an Inclusive Culture of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: An Inventory and Resource

Thompson Rivers University (TRU) is mandated to provide British Columbia’s Open Learning programming, as well as offering face-to-face courses in everything from trades to traditional academics. Our comprehensiveness can result in both creative linkages and communication gaps.

Our project aims to foster those linkages (and thereby bridge gaps) by engaging the TRU community in creating a resource on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Although a relatively new field of research at the post-secondary level, the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) has rapidly become very popular; for example, over a dozen learned journals in Canada are devoted to dissemination of SoTL in higher education. What better way to connect members of a teaching community than through their shared interests in, and writing about, processes of teaching and learning?

We will describe the process we undertook to develop an inventory and resource of SoTL and SoTL-related articles authored by members of our university community. An electronic account of publications that can be easily updated, a component of a proposed institutional repository, and a source of information and inspiration for scholars new to writing articles about teaching and learning, our annotated bibliography can also promote teaching and research intersections.

 

Participants in this session will come away with:

  1. A rationale for the development of a SoTL bibliography/inventory;
  2. Knowledge of the process in establishing a successful inventory;
  3. A beginner’s “tool kit” with which to undertake such a project at their own institution.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Ginny Ratsoy

Ginny Ratsoy

Associate Professor
Ginny Ratsoy teaches Canadian and Indigenous Literature at Thompson Rivers University. She has published on Experiential Learning in various (including Indigenous) contexts, as well as on Indigenous and Intercultural Theatre in Canada. She has written academic articles on, published... Read More →


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

International Business Education: Going Blended

The Graduate Certificate in International Business (IB) builds on previous post-secondary education to give students the skills they need to enter an exciting career working with people and organizations globally.

Offered by the Donald School of Business at Red Deer College, this post baccalaureate credential is the first of its kind in the Alberta post-secondary community and has, at its core, a blended model of delivery that will support the students in their studies, offer them the latest in access to IB experts (face to face and online), while giving them the technology environment that will promote their ability to function in a global economy.

Santiago Iñiguez, the Dean of Madrid’s IE Business School, in November 2013, supported the use of blended learning in business education, noting “It’s high-quality online learning combined with face-to-face sessions...Blended education is the future” (Jacobs, 2013).

Intended for instructional designers and post-secondary administrators, the learning outcomes for this session include understanding the global environment opportunities for learning, the reasons why the design team chose a blended model of technology enhanced executive weekends combined with wholly online delivery, and how this model supports the future design and development of business schools in Canada.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Nancy E. Batty

Nancy E. Batty

Academic Program Development Manager, Red Deer College
avatar for Diane Janes

Diane Janes

Associate Dean, Donald School of Business, Red Deer College


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Is technology in the classroom becoming the ‘cart before the horse’ over student learning outcomes?

SMART™ discusses why student collaboration is more relevant than ever and how to seamlessly integrate in your digital environment. In an increasing world of 1:1 digital learning what happens to real-time student collaboration?  The digital classroom is growing at a faster pace than student enrolment:  iPADs, cloud apps, smart phones, tablets, laptops, remote access, projection devices, interactive devices. Administering; class lists, class notes, opinion polling, formative assessments, whole class, small groups, collaborative and 1:1 learning …so much to deal with, so little time, so little training. 

 

While one solution doesn’t fit all, and, we need to make-way for multiple technologies inside and outside the classroom;  a good starting place is with an open-platform, a foundation that allows pedagogy to lead the way to student learning, not technology. 

 


Speakers

Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 350

2:45pm PDT

The Academy and Industry: Exploring Instructional Design Roles / Exploration des rôles en conception pédagogique dans le milieu universitaire et l’industrie
In a professional discipline, sometimes there can be uneasy tensions between those in the Academy (i.e. professors and researchers) and those in industry. This collaborative event will attempt to highlight some of the tensions that exist in instructional design. How do I.D. practices and conditions differ in the Academy vs in the corporate sector? How important is it to keep up with current research? What value is placed on formal credentials, or practical experience? We'll discuss during this 45 minute participatory round table session.

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University
avatar for Melissa Jakubec

Melissa Jakubec

Instructional Designer, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning
EE

Erika E. Smith

PhD Candidate, Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta
Educational technology and instructional designer for higher education.


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Examining Educational Culture Through a Learning Circle

Educational culture develops within a framework of learning. This is created through agreed-upon rules between teacher, learner and content. In this workshop, participants will examine both the framework and the experiences that inform the rules through a Learning Circle—a method of cooperative, oral reflection. Learning Circles are a way of sharing history, knowledge and decision making. The Learning Circle process changes the emphasis from teaching and coaching to encouraging flexible learning and finding answers from within one’s own lived experience. A Learning Circle is central to the notion of scholarly practice as it is based on inquiry and reflection. Through the experiential nature of a Learning Circle, there is an opportunity to allow patterns, themes and deep questions to surface about the practice of teaching and learning. It is within this space that innovation and creativity lies. Participants will be invited to consider the basis of their opinions and discover insights about their own practice. Christina and Dian have used Learning Circles extensively as a means of inquiry and exploration. The workshop will be limited to 25 participants.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Christina Cederlof

Christina Cederlof

Lecturer, University Employment Preparation, Thompson Rivers University
University and Employment Preparation
avatar for Dian Henderson

Dian Henderson

Senior Lecturer, English as a Second Language, Thompson Rivers University
Dian Henderson has been an educator for more than 30 years, working with students from elementary to teacher training. By exploring non-traditional approaches to education, Dian has discovered a means to enhance student voice and interest in writing and self-expression.  


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Creating Meaningful Partnerships: Collaborative Cross Sector Teacher Education

Authentic, meaningful and engaging education of pre-service teachers is of utmost importance in our increasingly complex educational landscape. If education students are to be prepared for the challenges of 21st century learning, they need to learn in authentic environments, working with not only university instructors, but also children and adolescents, teachers and administrators in order to develop deep understandings of the skills, knowledge and dispositions they will need for their chosen profession. In this symposium we talk about changing the culture of pre-service education as we explore new spaces and places for learning—for students and instructors alike.

In this presentation we will share a collaborative cross-sector approach to teacher education in a post-degree program. Working with two cohorts of secondary teacher education students, instructors based both on campus and in schools worked collaboratively to integrate their courses to enable students in their first term to learn about learning and teaching. These groups of students experienced situated-learning through weekly visits at a local secondary school, a seminar course led by secondary teachers from the same school and a collaborative teaching model with instructors from UVic, including a teaching team of instructors working in the Ministry of Education.

In this session, we will discuss the collaborative model and how it informed the design of the course experiences. The presenters, university instructors and students, will share their experience in interdisciplinary team-teaching and how they structured the courses to embody authentic learning through collaboration with various education partners.

 

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Researchers

Speakers
KS

Kathy Sanford

Professor, University of Victoria
Full professor from the University of Victoria.


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Engaging a Campus Community to Facilitate Change

Or, “Harnessing common sense and the blatantly obvious to foster community involvement in boring software implementation”

The University of Calgary undertook a three-year process to fully engage the university community in order to identify the next learning management system to be implemented on campus, and to manage the migration to the selected platform. The continuous engagement model that was implemented ensured that diverse voices and perspectives on blended and online learning were integrated into the decision making process.

Fourteen different faculties, each with its own academic models and signature pedagogies, provided strategic direction for their implementation, and the manner in which centrally provided services would be shaped in order to meet their unique needs. Key milestones were aligned with the academic calendar, and iterative pilot projects ensured that the platform was deployed and integrated with university systems in a reliable and sustainable manner, while informing the development of instructor training programs and course migration support. The LMS was framed as just one component of a cohesive and evolving online learning environment.

While the migration to a new LMS could devolve into endless discussions about the tools and their configuration, this engagement model focused on the activities that compose diverse teaching and learning practices. This focus resulted in a deeper connection and acted as the seed to initiate the development of a robust community of teaching and learning practitioners.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for D'Arcy Norman

D'Arcy Norman

Associate Director, University of Calgary


Thursday May 15, 2014 2:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

3:30pm PDT

How Does a Post-Secondary Student Influence Instructional Design of Online or Blended Courses

This session will look at the ways in which identifying and describing our students can or should influence the design of blended and/or online courses in a post-secondary environment. As institutions move to more student-centered pedagogical designs, the clearer articulation of who the student is impacts this process.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Discuss the impact of learner characteristics on program and or course design
  • Examine current data on who these learners may be
  • Discuss the instructional design impact


Audience: Anyone who is looking at designing and implementing blended and/or online courses or programs.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Kari Rasmussen

Kari Rasmussen

Educational Developer, Centre for Teaching & Learning, University of Alberta


Thursday May 15, 2014 3:30pm - 4:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

3:30pm PDT

Moving Beyond Traditional Frameworks: Competency-Based Assessment In The Digital Age

How can traditional higher education programs learn from competency-based assessment strategies? Existing assessment models remain suspended in traditional frameworks and have not kept pace with the high-tech environment distance education students currently demand. Competency-based education will disrupt these instruction models by offering more flexibility, reduced cost and an accelerated path to success. In today’s hyper-connected environments, students have access to a plethora of online learning resources. Educators and institutions must develop a secure structure for assessing knowledge in a manner that reduces the spiraling costs of face-to-face learning. A competency-based model offers a self-paced approach that meets the needs of nontraditional students seeking skills for the highly competitive, worldwide workplace.

Attendees can expect to learn the following:

  1. Why is a competency-based approach superior for assessing student outcomes?
  2. What secure technologies can be used to advance this shift?
  3. How do competency-based programs reinforce engagement between students and instructors?
  4. What kinds of structural changes must be made to our current education system to implement such a system?

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Dave Dutra

Dave Dutra

Partnership Coordinator, Proctor U


Thursday May 15, 2014 3:30pm - 4:15pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

6:30pm PDT

Banquet
Thursday May 15, 2014 6:30pm - 10:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8
 
Friday, May 16
 

8:00am PDT

Breakfast
Friday May 16, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

8:00am PDT

Registration and Information Table Open
Friday May 16, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

8:00am PDT

Vendor Showcase
Friday May 16, 2014 8:00am - 4:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

8:45am PDT

CAUCE-CNIE 2015 Announcement
Speakers
avatar for Marc Imbeault

Marc Imbeault

Dean of Studies and Research, Royal Military College


Friday May 16, 2014 8:45am - 9:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

9:00am PDT

Keynote: Brian Lamb
Speakers
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director of Learning Technology & Innovation, TRU Open Learning
Brian Lamb is Director, Learning Technology & Innovation. He spends a lot of time worrying about online ethics and practice, and sometimes he blogs about them at https://abject.ca Twitter: @brlamb... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

10:00am PDT

Break/Refreshment
Friday May 16, 2014 10:00am - 10:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Sources of Social Support that Facilitate Students’ Learning Online
With a growing need for lifelong learning and the accessibility of the internet to the most remote corners of Canada and the world, it is important to acquire successful ways to support students to complete their education There is sufficient research to document how educators effectively facilitate online learning, but little is known about other sources of support students perceive as useful.

The purpose of this presentation is to present the findings of a study undertaken to explore and describe the support systems nursing students utilized in their online learning. It came to our attention that students found other sources to facilitate their learning in the form of emotional, informational, instrumental and affirmational support from both online and offline sources.

Students’ identified their online peers as providing informational support when they helped to solve technical issues and shared resources for writing assignments. Families, nursing colleagues and employers were identified as providing offline support. These finding could be introduced to students in all disciplines as strategies to support their learning online.

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Kim Munich

Kim Munich

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Kim Munich is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, Canada. Dr. Munich’s year career began with nursing clients in medical-surgical wards, Neuro ICU, extended care, community, and especially maternal/child high risk obstetrics... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Is technology in the classroom becoming the ‘cart before the horse’ over student learning outcomes? 2

SMART™ discusses why student collaboration is more relevant than ever and how to seamlessly integrate in your digital environment.

In an increasing world of 1:1 digital learning what happens to real-time student collaboration?  The digital classroom is growing at a faster pace than student enrolment:  iPADs, cloud apps, smart phones, tablets, laptops, remote access, projection devices, interactive devices. Administering; class lists, class notes, opinion polling, formative assessments, whole class, small groups, collaborative and 1:1 learning …so much to deal with, so little time, so little training. 

 

While one solution doesn’t fit all, and, we need to make-way for multiple technologies inside and outside the classroom;  a good starting place is with an open-platform, a foundation that allows pedagogy to lead the way to student learning, not technology. 

 

 


Speakers

Friday May 16, 2014 10:15am - 11:00am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Introducing The Canadian eLearning Network

The Canadian eLearning Network (CANeLearn http://canelearn.net) is a newly registered Canadian federal not-for-profit society. CANeLearn's mission is to provide leadership that champions student success in K-12 online and blended learning. It provides members with networking, collaboration and research opportunities.

The organization is in its infancy and is looking to strengthen its network through affiliations with other Canadian-based organizations, and we see an important fit between CANeLearn and CNIE. With a specific focus on the K-12 sector, and technology-supported education in both online and blended learning environments, CANeLearn shares similar goals and brings with it a growing network of K-12 online and technology-oriented educators and leaders within school programs.

This session will provide delegates with an overview of CANeLearn and invite conversation into how the new network can work with partners in K-12 and post-secondary in supporting online and blended learning. Examples of projects CANeLearn members are taking a lead in through its Centre for Innovation will be discussed, and delegates be invited to share in research and initiatives underway or under consideration.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Researchers, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Randy LaBonte

Randy LaBonte

CEO, Canadian eLearning Network
Randy is CEO of the Canadian eLearning Network (CANeLearn.net), an organization formed to be the leading voice for K-12 blended and online learning in Canada. He teaches online at Vancouver Island University and CANeLearn, helping K-12 teachers transition practices to online environments... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

The Media is the Pedagogy

This presentation looks at the affordances of technologies employed for teaching and learning in distance education. Specifically, it looks at LMS systems and their support for group learning. It then examines the need for networked and set-based learning and the tools that best support these in formal education and lifelong learning. Building on the ideas of our 2014 open access book, Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media, we illustrate with demonstrations of our Elgg-based social network, Athabasca Landing, a next generation of distance education tools. We argue that social networks create spaces that allow for generative learning that is owned by learners and persists beyond the end of a course. Rather than use commercial systems such as LinkedIn or Facebook, we argue that institutionally owned “walled gardens with windows” offer a more effective and more controllable environment to support networked and set-based learning.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Terry Anderson

Terry Anderson

Professor, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for Jon Dron

Jon Dron

Associate Professor - School of Computing and Information Systems, Athabasca University
I'm a professional learner. I don't believe in academic disciplines much because way too many things interest me and pigeonholes get in the way. Mostly my work straddles the borders between technology and learning but I take inspiration where I find it - evolutionary theory, complexity... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Teaching and Learning Language Beyond the Classroom

Experiential Learning Theory describes learning as a process that involves transactions between the person and the wider, “real-world” environment in contrast to the traditional, “limited by books, teacher and classroom environment” (Kolb, 1984). Such an active involvement in authentic language experiences is crucial for language development. Thus, moving language instruction beyond the classroom becomes a significant educational tactic for language instructors.

In the experiential learning environment, students take on the “new role” of a “language ‘user’ outside the classroom,” compared to their common role of a language ‘learner’ in the classroom (Springer & Collins, 2008). Such a participation, the first phase of Kolb’s experiential cycle, then leads to the next two phases: reflection and meaningful application of the learned language skills.

Based on recent research and data collected in an English for Academic Purposes classroom, this presentation will discuss cognitive and sociocultural aspects of task-based language teaching and learning and will explore how incorporating on-campus events and activities into the formal ESL instruction can create a new “real-world” learning environment for second language learners and help them expand their language skills.

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, Instructional designers


Speakers
avatar for Susanna Fawkes

Susanna Fawkes

ESL instructor, Thompson Rivers University
InstructorEnglish as a Second LanguageThompson Rivers University


Friday May 16, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:15am PDT

Adopting Digital Literacies to Support Project-Based Learning in Upper Level Classrooms
Speakers
avatar for Martha Gabriel

Martha Gabriel

Professor Faculty of Education, University of Prince Edward Island


Friday May 16, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

10:45am PDT

What Can CNIE do for you?

Amidst all the chaos of day-to-day life within your education career, what CNIE activities can (or could) we do for you?

We will examine a survey done to determine numerous demographic details to describe your type of employment, language preference, geographic region, etc. We hope to learn whether your professional interest is in K-12 or post secondary; if post secondary, would that be University, College, Cégep, other? Is your educational modality distance, face-to-face, online or a blend of these?

We hope to have the results of a membership survey that captures: (1) your interests in response to a broad range of questions, (2) input from Board members, and (3) a survey of other organizations similar to CNIE.

The session will close with some discussion on recent website activities and seek your input on future web focus.

Driving this kind of investigation is our commitment to maintaining a growing and active membership.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Speakers
avatar for Bill Fricker

Bill Fricker

Bonne Journée Strategies


Friday May 16, 2014 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:15am PDT

Break
Friday May 16, 2014 11:15am - 11:30am PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Integrating Information Literacy and Research Skills into the Curriculum

This presentation will discuss the integration of information literacy and research skills into the curriculum of Distance and Open Education History self-paced courses, offered online by Athabasca University. Learning takes place through interactive, automated modules delivered at distance and online. The modules teach students through the course the information literacy skills they have to demonstrate to complete their research essay assignments satisfactorily. The modules offer students flexibility and feedback and teach the information literacy skills that students require in most History or Humanities courses and which frequently cause frustration to improperly instructed students and their instructors: library skills, critical reading, research, academic essay writing, documentation and academic integrity (avoiding plagiarism). Students’ information literacy skills are assessed in three ways: automated quizzes, assignments and the final examination. The mastery of these literacy skills prepares students for academic success and intellectual satisfaction. The above teaching and learning strategy has been implemented in Moodle successfully, and currently the course is open and students are enrolled. An evaluation project to assess the literacy information skills modules is being conducted.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Luis Guadarrama

Luis Guadarrama

Learning Designer, Centre for Learning Design and Development, Athabasca University
luisg@athabascau.ca (Work) luismx66@gmail.com (Personal) Luis Guadarrama completed his MA Educational Technology at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. Working in Mexican and Canadian universities, Guadarrama is currently a Learning Designer at Athabasca University, where... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Mathematics, online help, and emotional presence

The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics using online coaching. In the program, communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Students range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom et al. (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching, the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison et al., 2000, 2001). Survey data and transcript analysis indicates that emotional presence is a natural part of a four-element framework for analysis of one-to-one online coaching. Abbreviations, special words and symbols, such as emoticons, are used regularly as an instrument to enhance the visibility between the coach and coachee. It serves as a replacement for face-to-face non-verbal communication. Also, sharing of emotions and moods between two individuals as people and about the coaching activity are common.

This presentation will review the proposed framework for online coaching consisting of cognitive, social, teaching and emotional presence. A special focus will be on the role emotion may play in such environments. Beyond discussion of theory, implications for practice and training of online coaches will be discussed in an interactive session with guided dialogue.  

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Martha Cleveland-Innes

Martha Cleveland-Innes

Professor & Chair, Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University
avatar for Stefan Hrastinski

Stefan Hrastinski

Professor, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
avatar for Stefan Stenbom

Stefan Stenbom

Lecturer, PhD candidate, Department of Learning, KTH Royal Institute of Technology


Friday May 16, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

The AIM in the Post-secondary Classroom

The AIM (Accelerative Integrated Method) is a gesture-supported language teaching methodology developed over the past ten years by B.C. educator Wendy Maxwell and now widely implemented throughout K-12 school boards throughout Canada and the U.S. Its outcomes-based approach coincides with the objectives of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages now being implemented in language teaching worldwide. The AIM is currently being piloted in a section of beginners’ French at TRU. This is the first use of the methodology at the post-secondary level in Canada.

In this workshop will begin with a brief demonstration of the teaching technique by giving a sample interactive lesson using a fictitious language so that attendees can experience the methodology first-hand as learners. We will view some of the AIM materials and discuss how the methodology was applied in a section of FREN 1000 at TRU in 2013. A brief review of existing research on the method will be provided, and successes and opportunities will be discussed. The session will conclude with an overview of a formal research project now underway through the TRU Teaching and Learning Scholars program to measure the efficacy of the AIM in the post-secondary classroom. Audience participation, questions, input and discussion are highly encouraged.

This presentation may be of interest to second-language teachers at both the K-12 and post-secondary levels. It may also interest instructional designers and researchers working on second language acquisition, adult learning and gesture-based learning.

 

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Instructional designers, Researchers

Speakers
avatar for Annette Dominik

Annette Dominik

Senior Lecturer, English and Modern Languages, Thompson Rivers University
Dr. Annette Dominik teaches French, Spanish and Linguistics at TRU. Her commitment to teaching inspires her to innovate in many areas of teaching and learning, including pioneering early field schools in Modern Languages.


Friday May 16, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

Walking the Talk: Signature Pedagogies and Metateaching in Graduate-Level Education Courses

Many M.Ed. programs claim to incorporate signature pedagogies in their programs, which often include approaches such as inquiry-based, case-based and problem-based learning, communities of learners, and more.

Teacher education is unique among disciplines in that we are doing what we are teaching. Metateaching has been defined as thinking about teaching (Timpson 1999), but if metacognition is thinking about thinking, and a meta-language is a language about languages, then metateaching is in fact teaching about teaching. If we combine this with notions of signature pedagogies and the idea that we should be modeling what we are teaching, then what does this mean at the graduate level?

It means that graduate instructors should themselves be modeling what they are teaching. Wouldn’t signature pedagogy in education be one that actually implements the theories and models being studied in order to teach those same theories and models? Shouldn’t it be one that employs experimental designs and invites the students (most of whom are teachers) to examine the course design as it is being taught? Wouldn’t it make sense to have the students have input into the design and/or teaching?

This presentation will examine the common approach to teaching graduate-level education courses—the seminar—and suggest an alternate approach that uses the theories and models being taught and where the teaching methodology matches the kind of work the participants will do when they graduate.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers

Speakers
avatar for Katrin Becker

Katrin Becker

Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Information Systems, Mount Royal University


Friday May 16, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

11:30am PDT

‘Kenkneyt’: BScN Student Immersion in Rural Aboriginal Nursing Practice

To address the identified shortage of registered nurses and their high rate of turnover in First Nations communities, a clinical nursing education practice hub was established at the Conayt Friendship Centre in Merritt, BC, in 2011. The intention of this partnership was twofold: to strengthen friendship and cooperation between Aboriginal peoples and the faculty/students of TRU School of Nursing, and to provide culturally relevant education to BScN students who would then promote the health of Aboriginal people.

 

The intended audience for this presentation includes post-secondary educators and community-based researchers interested in Aboriginal contexts. This presentation might also be of value to K-12 teachers, particularly those associated with First Nations communities. The ‘Kәnkneyt’ presentation will focus on the:

  • History of the Conayt Nursing Education Hub
  • Enactment of the Conayt curriculum: Development of resources for an immersion clinical experience
  • Movement forward: Present-day and future plans

Learning outcomes include an increased understanding by presentation participants regarding:

  • The theoretical basis for practice in the Conayt/Nicola Valley centres and where this knowledge was accessed
  • How the locations of clinical placements contributed to student learning and the health of the communities in which they were located
  • The rewards and challenges of this immersion experience for BScN Student in rural Aboriginal nursing practice

 

Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, K-12 educators, Researchers

Speakers
avatar for Sherrie Bade

Sherrie Bade

School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Nicola Valley Elders

Nicola Valley Elders

Conayt Friendship Centre
avatar for Steven Ross

Steven Ross

Lecturer, School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Tanya Sanders

Tanya Sanders

Lecturer, School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University


Friday May 16, 2014 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:00pm PDT

A Dynamic Learning Archive: The Value of Visible and Persistent Artifacts in Online Learning Environments

This presentation, of interest to individuals teaching online and at a distance as well as those working in instructional design, outlines the results of a multi-year, design-based doctoral research study. This study examines the use of a socially networked online learning environment as a virtual classroom offering openness through its capacity to create, annotate, rate and comment upon persistent artefacts. Additionally, the study examines how students engage a dynamic course archive containing artefacts from current and past learners. The archive is used to support learners in an online graduate level course by offering access to the day-to-day conversations of current and prior learners along with various artefacts created in these current and prior course sections. The study looks at the use, value and perceived barriers in the use of such an archive and it attempts to challenge our current understanding of what students benefit from in their learning processes.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Stuart Berry

Stuart Berry

Instructor, School of Business, Camosun College


Friday May 16, 2014 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 348 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

12:30pm PDT

Lunch
Friday May 16, 2014 12:30pm - 1:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

A Framework for the Design of Computer-Assisted Simulation Training for Complex Police Situations

The article reports progress concerning the design of a computer-assisted simulation training (CAST) platform for developing decision making skills in police students. The overarching aim is to outline a theoretical framework for the design of computer-assisted simulation training to facilitate police students’ development of search techniques in complex interactions within the built environment, learning to apply and perform the five “quick peek” techniques for information gathering and subsequent risk evaluation. The article draws on Luckin’s Ecology of Resources model of learner context informed with perspectives on reflective thinking from Dewey and Schön. The article discusses design issues within the Ecology of Resources model applied on CAST for complex police situations.

 

Of Interest to: Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists

Speakers
avatar for Greg Anderson

Greg Anderson

Dean, Office of Applied Research and Graduate Studies, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Ron Bowles

Ron Bowles

Associate Dean, Office of Applied Research and Graduate Studies, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Tor Soderstrom

Tor Soderstrom

Professor, UMEA University


Friday May 16, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Alpine Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Engaging the 21st Century Learner

My target audience is educators practicing in K-12 and perhaps university professors as well. The three concepts/ideas participants will walk away with include: skills necessary to teach online, tools necessary to teach online, pedagogy of online learning and discussion of asynchronous or synchronous delivery model.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, K-12 educators


Speakers
avatar for Corrie Macdonald

Corrie Macdonald

Educator, Kamloops Online Learning, KOOL
Corrie Macdonald I am an online teacher with @Kool in Kamloops.  I have been a classroom teacher for over twenty years and the past four years I have been an on-line teachers.  I have been part of a team of Planning 10 teachers who have created a student centered course, related... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, CAC 346 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Development of a Mobile Evaluation Tool for Post Graduate Medical Education

The Post Graduate Medical Education (PGME) Office at the University of Toronto uses the POWER system to electronically track learner registration and assessment data. There are three main evaluations that are facilitated through POWER: the resident-in-training evaluations, rotation evaluations and at least one teacher evaluation. This data is used to assess learner performance, to improve the educational experience and to support teacher promotions.


Since the inception of the POWER system in 2004, there have not been any changes to the evaluation tools. In 2014, the PGME Office began developing a mobile evaluation application to modernize the evaluation tool and to increase evaluation rates and learner response time.

The POWER vendor Knowledge for You provided PGME with a prototype based on a mobile evaluation application developed for Undergraduate Medical Education at the University of Toronto. The prototype was circulated to a group of Program Directors, learners and administrative staff. Feedback was applied to the prototype and the application was released into the quality assurance environment for further testing by faculty, learners and administrators.

The application is scheduled to be delivered into the production environment for the 2014/2015 academic year. Beta testing feedback from learners indicates a positive reception for this application. An evaluation of the application will be conducted after it has been launched for a year to determine the impact on evaluation rates and learner response time.


Of Interest to: Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers, Educational technologists, Administrators

Procedure Log Acknowledgement : This project was completed with support from the Postgraduate Medical Education Vice Dean Dr. Salvatore Spadafora, POWER Steering Committee Chair Dr. Kevin Imrie, Director of Policy and Analysis Caroline Abrahams, Director of Operations Loreta Muharumha and with contributions from User Support Services Officer Khush Adaita and Medical Education Coordinator Natali Chin.

 

Mobile Evaluations Acknowledgement: This project was completed with support from the Postgraduate Medical Education Vice Dean Dr. Salvatore Spadafora, Associate Dean Dr. Glen Bandiera, Director of Policy and Analysis Caroline Abrahams, Director of Operations Loreta Muharumha and with contributions from User Support Services Officer Khush Adaita and Medical Education Coordinator Natali Chin.


Speakers
avatar for Alison Pattern

Alison Pattern

Project Manager, Learner Systems Integration - Post Graduate Medical Education, University of Toronto


Friday May 16, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

Creativity Takes Courage: Safeguarding Academic Rigour while Bringing Innovative Video Technology into Masters-Level Assignments

Is it possible to safeguard academic rigour while bringing innovative technology into university classrooms? This study session discusses using Mozilla Popcorn Maker to produce video assignments which enrich applied learning.

Bringing innovative technology into academic teaching and learning presents challenges for both instructors and students. At the same time, the challenge directly feeds into community building and the added value of applied learning. This presentation discusses the impact, benefits and limitations of an assignment to compile a 3-5 minute video clip using Mozilla Popcorn Maker at the outset of a blended Masters program in an applied social science program (conflict analysis and management). The case study demonstrates how the sharing of the assignment challenge and products contributed to preparing students for the beginning of their academic program, and more importantly contributed to a strong sense of community and set the context for a safe learning environment. Presenters analysed strategies for an assessment matrix to safeguard academic rigour while recognizing diverse abilities for dealing with technology challenges and innovation. In conclusion, they offer best practices and lessons learned for replicating the assignment in similar learning environments.

 

Both presenters will be conducting the presentation remotely. Thereby, the interaction with the audience will have to adapt to the synchronous environment, engaging them in dialogue through the blended format.

 

Of Interest to: Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Instructional Designer, CTET, Royal Roads University
avatar for Eva Malisius

Eva Malisius

Program Head, Conflict Analysis & Management, Royal Roads University
While conflicts are my area of expertise - I do prefer to avoid them... My passion is communicating with others and bringing people together, ideally with good chocolate and wine involved. Being new to Canada (I moved here about 2 years ago), I also enjoy getting to know Canada... Read More →


Friday May 16, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Boardroom 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

1:30pm PDT

The Power of PBL in the 21st Century Middle School Library
In an education environment in which technology and web-based research factor so prominently the question is: Are school libraries still relevant or even necessary? The answer is yes. This presentation focuses on the how the library in West Kelowna’s Constable Neil Bruce Middle School (CNB) has been retooled and repurposed to provide an invigorating and enriching learning environment for all students.

Designed for K-12 Educators (primarily those with a Humanities teaching area), this presentation will feature an overview of the role that the library space plays in a Project-Based Learning (PBL) setting. Throughout this presentation we will discuss how the library, in terms of its physical space and resources, plays a pivotal role in enriching the learning experience of students. Our presentation will begin with a very brief overview of PBL, but the primary focus will be on the pivotal role that the library serves in the PBL process. To demonstrate we will provide examples of PBL endeavours from grades 7, 8 and 9 Social Studies, including our school’s award-winning Civilizations PBL. While the emphasis will be primarily from the area of Social Studies, other curricular areas will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jillian Cornock

Jillian Cornock

Social Studies, Teacher, Constable Neil Bruce Middle School
avatar for Dayna Hart

Dayna Hart

Teacher librarian, Constable Neil Bruce Middle School


Friday May 16, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, TRUSU Lecture Hall 900 McGill Road, Kamloops BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:30pm PDT

Break
Friday May 16, 2014 2:30pm - 2:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Terrace Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada V2C 0C8

2:45pm PDT

Keynote: Learning Ecologies as a Framework for Informal Teacher Professional Development

A learning ecology is “‘a set of contexts made up of configurations of activities, materials, resources and relations generated in physical or virtual spaces, which provide opportunities for learning”, as defined by Barron.

Currently, there is a myriad of digital resources that are used by teachers to informally develop themselves professionally. OER, MOOCs, Personal Learning Environments, Communities of Practice … are in the move towards each individual being responsible for taking his/her own decisions on learning, rather than simply accepting those formally proposed. Several authors have described the benefits of informal learning, based on connectivism, and placing great emphasis on the benefits which these learning networks can provide for professional development.

A key aspect of the updating of professional development is personalization: adapting policies to the specific needs of each individual, according to their learning style. It is clear that the use of ICT in education extends the potential learning space for professional development and updating of skills, thereby generating lots of learning opportunities.

The concept of learning ecology could be a useful tool to help each professional to create a complex structure of interlinked relations and components which form an own learning ecology: a personal strategy for professional development and relations.

The research aims to analyze and understand the ways in which learning ecologies are and will be contributing to the professional development of primary school teachers.

In this presentation, the design and the current stage of the research will be introduced, as well as its initial outcomes.

Of Interest to: K-12 education, Online and distance education, Post-secondary education, Instructional designers, Researchers

Speakers
avatar for Albert Sangrà

Albert Sangrà

eLearn Center, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya


Friday May 16, 2014 2:45pm - 3:45pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

3:45pm PDT

Closing Remarks
Friday May 16, 2014 3:45pm - 4:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

3:45pm PDT

Closing Remarks
Speakers
avatar for Melissa Jakubec

Melissa Jakubec

Instructional Designer, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning


Friday May 16, 2014 3:45pm - 4:00pm PDT
Campus Activity Centre, Mountain Room 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC, Canada, V2C 0C8

4:30pm PDT

McQueen Lake Nature Outing: Hoot and Howl
Join us on May 16 at McQueen Lake for a BBQ dinner and a unique outdoor natural history experience with Thompson River University’s Dean of Science, Tom Dickinson, a biologist. He will lead a birdwatching walk (the “hoot”) around the lake, followed by a “howl” for coyotes as night falls. A great opportunity to get some fresh air, a little exercise, and learn more about the area’s natural history.

Friday May 16, 2014 4:30pm - 10:00pm PDT
McQueen Lake Kamloops, BC, Canada
 
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